emollient

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Related to Emollients: eczema

e·mol·lient

 (ĭ-mŏl′yənt)
adj.
1. Softening and soothing, especially to the skin.
2. Making less harsh or abrasive; mollifying: the emollient approach of a diplomatic mediator.
n.
1. An agent that softens or soothes the skin.
2. An agent that assuages or mollifies.

[Latin ēmolliēns, ēmollient-, present participle of ēmollīre, to soften : ē-, ex-, intensive pref.; see ex- + mollīre, to soften (from mollis, soft; see mel- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

emollient

(ɪˈmɒlɪənt)
adj
1. (Medicine) softening or soothing, esp to the skin
2. helping to avoid confrontation; calming
n
(Medicine) any preparation or substance that has a softening or soothing effect, esp when applied to the skin
[C17: from Latin ēmollīre to soften, from mollis soft]
eˈmollience n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•mol•lient

(ɪˈmɒl yənt)

adj.
1. having the power to soften or soothe: an emollient lotion for the skin.
n.
2. an emollient substance.
[1635–45; < Latin ēmollient-, s. of ēmolliēns, present participle of ēmollīre to soften =ē- e- + mollīre to soften, derivative mollis soft]
e•mol′lience, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

emollient

, emolliate - Emollient is from Latin emolliere, "to soften"; to emolliate is to soften or make effeminate.
See also related terms for soften.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

emollient

a medical preparation that has a soothing effect on surface tissues.
See also: Remedies
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.emollient - toiletry consisting of any of various substances in the form of a thick liquid that have a soothing and moisturizing effect when applied to the skinemollient - toiletry consisting of any of various substances in the form of a thick liquid that have a soothing and moisturizing effect when applied to the skin
cold cream, coldcream, face cream, vanishing cream - a cream used cosmetically (mostly by women) for softening and cleaning the skin
hand cream - moisturizing cream for the hands
lanolin - an emollient containing wool fat (a fatty substance obtained from the wool of sheep)
nard, spikenard - an aromatic ointment used in antiquity
sun blocker, sunblock, sunscreen - a cream spread on the skin; contains a chemical (as PABA) to filter out ultraviolet light and so protect from sunburn
toilet articles, toiletry - artifacts used in making your toilet (washing and taking care of your body)
Adj.1.emollient - having a softening or soothing effect especially to the skin
soft - yielding readily to pressure or weight
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

emollient

noun
1. moisturizer, oil, cream, lotion, balm, ointment, salve, liniment, lenitive Grapeseed oil is a gentle emollient.
adjective
1. soothing, softening, assuaging, palliative, balsamic, mollifying, moisturizing, demulcent, lenitive, assuasive an emollient cream which I find invaluable for sunburn
2. conciliatory, calming, disarming, appeasing, pacifying, pacific, mollifying, peaceable, placatory, irenic, propitiative The government's recent tone has been emollient.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

emollient

[ɪˈmɒlɪənt]
A. ADJemoliente
B. Nemoliente m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

emollient

[ɪˈmɒliənt]
n (= cream, lotion) → émollient m
adj
[cream, lotion, ingredients] → émollient(e)
[person] → conciliant(e); [approach] → conciliant(e); [speech, statement] → conciliant(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

emollient

(Med)
adjlindernd
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

e·mol·li·ent

a. emoliente, que suaviza la piel o mucosas interiores.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

emollient

adj & n emoliente m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Bucket brings the finger into play as an emollient.
Animal and plant-derived emollients that are devoid of chemical modifications are witnessing a steady surge in demand.
Tub bathing, emollients, and even plastic dressings can protect the fragile skin of preterm infants during the first few crucial weeks of extrauterine life.
Innospec Performance Chemicals is a manufacturer and supplier of specialty surfactants, silicones, emollients, polymers and specialty additives to the personal care, cosmetic and household, industrial and institutional cleaning markets.
West Yorkshire Fire and Rescue Service (WYFRS) launched a project to look at the issue following three deaths in West Yorkshire where paraffin-based emollients were believed to have accelerated the speed and intensity of the fire.
The bath emollients used in the study included Aveeno bath oil, and Oilatum bath additive and Balneum bath oil--products available largely in the United Kingdom--along with others.
These included a link between colder weather and drier, itchy skin, and sodium lauryl sulphate in emollients and other toiletries.
But don't make the mistake of stopping using emollients if your skin isn't flaring up, says Dylan Griffiths of skin care firm Eucerin.
Emollients. Emollients are used to soften skin and create a smoother appearance by filling in the gaps between the corneocytes (the cells that make up a majority of the SC).
Atopic dermatitis; eczema; emollients; filaggrin; food allergy; inflammatory cytokines; interleukin; T helper cells
Emollients Esters is the class of emollients which forms a major component of personal care products.