empathy

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empathy

ability to imagine oneself in the condition of another; a vicarious participation in another’s emotions: The widow expressed empathy for the woman who had just lost her husband.
Not to be confused with:
compassion – a deep sympathy for the sorrows of others, with an urge to alleviate their pain: The nurse showed great compassion for the injured children.
sympathy – a general kinship with another’s feelings no matter of what kind: He sent a sympathy card to the widow.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

em·pa·thy

 (ĕm′pə-thē)
n.
1. The ability to identify with or understand the perspective, experiences, or motivations of another individual and to comprehend and share another individual's emotional state. See Synonyms at pity.
2. The projection of one's own feelings or thoughts onto something else, such as an object in a work of art or a character in a novel or film.

[en- + -pathy (translation of German Einfühlung).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

empathy

(ˈɛmpəθɪ)
n
1. the power of understanding and imaginatively entering into another person's feelings. See also identification3b
2. the attribution to an object, such as a work of art, of one's own emotional or intellectual feelings about it
[C20: from Greek empatheia affection, passion, intended as a rendering of German Einfühlung, literally: a feeling in; see en-2, -pathy]
ˈempathist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em•pa•thy

(ˈɛm pə θi)

n.
1. the identification with or vicarious experiencing of the feelings, thoughts, etc., of another.
2. the imaginative ascribing to an object of one's feelings or attitudes.
[1904; < Greek empátheia affection (see em-2, -pathy)]
syn: See sympathy.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

empathy

, sympathy - Empathy denotes a deep emotional understanding of another's feelings or problems, while sympathy is more general and can apply to small annoyances or setbacks.
See also related terms for problems.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

empathy

the power of entering into another’s personality and imaginatively experiencing his feelings. — empathie, adj.
See also: Understanding
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empathy - understanding and entering into another's feelingsempathy - understanding and entering into another's feelings
fellow feeling, sympathy - sharing the feelings of others (especially feelings of sorrow or anguish)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

empathy

noun
empathy with understanding of, feeling for, appreciation of, compassion for, rapport with, commiseration for the king's empathy with the suffering of his people
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

empathy

noun
1. Sympathetic, sad concern for someone in misfortune:
2. A very close understanding between persons:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

empathy

[ˈempəθɪ] Nidentificación f, empatía f
to feel empathy with sbidentificarse con algn
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

empathy

[ˈɛmpəθi] nempathie f
to feel empathy with sb → comprendre ce que ressent qn
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

empathy

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

empathy

[ˈɛmpəθɪ] nimmedesimazione f
to feel empathy with sb → immedesimarsi nei sentimenti di qn
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

em·pa·thy

n. empatía, comprensión y apreciación de los sentimientos de otra persona.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

empathy

n empatía
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
You must get some healthy emotional distance from the object of your desire.
They might perceive their partner's emotional distance but miss the connection to their own habitual behaviour.
Coherent narrative refers to how clearly, logically, and with what appropriate emotional distance a parent tells the story of their life to their child.
Whereas emotional distance is what women feel when they interact with financial institutions as they perceive that the financial services offered do not sufficiently represent their interests or needs.
Conflicts, if left buried, ignored, dismissed, or unsettled, could create emotional distance, dull the relationship, and even bring about depression in some cases.
Like his character, he keeps an emotional distance from his son(s), though I would have liked more despair and regret to creep through his stiff facade by the end.
Further, in Israel, there is an enormous emotional distance between secular and religious Jews (Haredim) who live apart and between whom even intermarriages are uncommon.
Opponents fear they will increase civilian deaths due to the emotional distance between user and victim.
The brothers embraced and cried, reunited after many years of physical and emotional distance.
Meanwhile, Miranda and Dan's son Harry (Jonas Moore) wrestles with drug addiction and the growing emotional distance from his loved ones.
narcissism?), the fearless quality that makes him a movie star, the self-abnegation of the zealot whose childhood ambition was to be a priest -- and perhaps the emotional distance which many have noted in real-life Cruise.
Keeping an emotional distance with patients makes it easier to do this job.