Empedocles


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Related to Empedocles: Democritus, Anaxagoras

Em·ped·o·cles

 (ĕm-pĕd′ə-klēz′) Fifth century bc.
Greek philosopher who believed that all matter is composed of earth, air, fire and water, and that all change is caused by attraction and repulsion.

Empedocles

(ɛmˈpɛdəˌkliːz)
n
(Biography) ?490–430 bc, Greek philosopher and scientist, who held that the world is composed of four elements, air, fire, earth, and water, which are governed by the opposing forces of love and discord

Em•ped•o•cles

(ɛmˈpɛd əˌkliz)

n.
c490–c430 B.C., Greek philosopher and statesman.
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Noun1.Empedocles - Greek philosopher who taught that all matter is composed of particles of fire and water and air and earth (fifth century BC)
Translations

Empedocles

[ɛmˈpɛdəˌkliːz] nEmpedocle m
References in classic literature ?
Even when a treatise on medicine or natural science is brought out in verse, the name of poet is by custom given to the author; and yet Homer and Empedocles have nothing in common but the metre, so that it would be right to call the one poet, the other physicist rather than poet.
For it is most true, that a natural and secret hatred, and aversation towards society, in any man, hath somewhat of the savage beast; but it is most untrue, that it should have any character at all, of the divine nature; except it proceed, not out of a pleasure in solitude, but out of a love and desire to sequester a man's self, for a higher conversation: such as is found to have been falsely and feignedly in some of the heathen; as Epimenides the Candian, Numa the Roman, Empedocles the Sicilian, and Apollonius of Tyana; and truly and really, in divers of the ancient hermits and holy fathers of the church.
Some raillery follows; and at length Socrates is induced to reply, 'that colour is the effluence of form, sensible, and in due proportion to the sight.' This definition is exactly suited to the taste of Meno, who welcomes the familiar language of Gorgias and Empedocles. Socrates is of opinion that the more abstract or dialectical definition of figure is far better.
When at long intervals we turn over their abstruse pages, wonderful seems the calm and grand air of these few, these great spiritual lords who have walked in the world,--these of the old religion,--dwelling in a worship which makes the sanctities of Christianity look parvenues and popular; for "persuasion is in soul, but necessity is in intellect." This band of grandees, Hermes, Heraclitus, Empedocles, Plato, Plotinus, Olympiodorus, Proclus, Synesius and the rest, have somewhat so vast in their logic, so primary in their thinking, that it seems antecedent to all the ordinary distinctions of rhetoric and literature, and to be at once poetry and music and dancing and astronomy and mathematics.
But the highest minds of the world have never ceased to explore the double meaning, or shall I say the quadruple or the centuple or much more manifold meaning, of every sensuous fact; Orpheus, Empedocles, Heraclitus, Plato, Plutarch, Dante, Swedenborg, and the masters of sculpture, picture, and poetry.
Larnaca municipal secretary, Lefteris Empedocles, 57, was sentenced to five years in prison for corruption on Tuesday in connection with taking money to sort out building code infractions but eventually pocketing the cash.
(107) In his exposition of the [phrase omitted], Aristotle proceeds as follows: he first introduces the topic and remarks on how it is generally overlooked; (108) then, quite surprisingly, (109) he returns to the doxography, from which his readers had been freed in book 1, to discuss the views of "those around Hesiod and all the theologians" (110) and the only philosophic precedent in some verses of Empedocles; (111) and finally, because this [phrase omitted] is unprecedented, Aristotle is forced to articulate it almost ex nihilo, which he does, repeating at the close how it is generally overlooked.
They cover Eris and Epos: composition, competition, and the domestication of strife; Ritornell and episodic composition in Empedocles; the complexity of the epic diction; searching for Homeric fandom in Greek tragedy; Illiad II: healing, healers, Nestor, and Medea; Penelope as a tragic heroine: choral dynamics in Homeric epic; and variations on the myth of the abduction of Ganymede: intertextuality and narratology.
E digno de nota que uma nocao do prazer marcada pelo preenchimento de uma falta esta presente em testemunhos de Empedocles (29) fornecidos pelo doxografo Aecio (sec.