empirical

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em·pir·i·cal

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭ-kəl)
adj.
1.
a. Relying on or derived from observation or experiment: empirical results that supported the hypothesis.
b. Verifiable or provable by means of observation or experiment: empirical laws.
2. Guided by practical experience and not theory, especially in medicine.

em·pir′i·cal·ly adv.

empirical

(ɛmˈpɪrɪkəl) ,

empiric

or

empiricutic

adj
1. derived from or relating to experiment and observation rather than theory
2. (Medicine) (of medical treatment) based on practical experience rather than scientific proof
3. (Philosophy) philosophy
a. (of knowledge) derived from experience rather than by logic from first principles. Compare a priori, a posteriori
b. (of a proposition) subject, at least theoretically, to verification. Compare analytic4, synthetic4
4. (Medicine) of or relating to medical quackery
n
(Statistics) statistics the posterior probability of an event derived on the basis of its observed frequency in a sample. Compare mathematical probability See also posterior probability
emˈpirically adv
emˈpiricalness n

em•pir•i•cal

(ɛmˈpɪr ɪ kəl)

adj.
1. derived from experience or experiment.
2. depending upon experience or observation alone, without using scientific method or theory, esp. in medicine.
3. verifiable by experience or experiment.
[1560–70]
em•pir′i•cal•ly, adv.

em·pir·i·cal

(ĕm-pîr′ĭ-kəl)
Relying on or derived from observation or experiment rather than theory: empirical results prove the theory.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.empirical - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
theoretic, theoretical - concerned primarily with theories or hypotheses rather than practical considerations; "theoretical science"
2.empirical - relying on medical quackery; "empiric treatment"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression

empirical

empiric
adjective first-hand, direct, observed, practical, actual, experimental, pragmatic, factual, experiential There is no empirical evidence to support his theory.
assumed, academic, speculative, hypothetical, putative, theoretic(al), conjectural
Translations
empirický
empiirinenkokeellinen
empirijskiiskustven

empirical

[emˈpɪrɪkəl] ADJ [method] → empírico

empirical

[ɪmˈpɪrɪkəl] adj [data, evidence, research, study] → empirique

empirical

adj, empirically
advempirisch

empirical

[ɛmˈpɪrɪkl] adjempirico/a

empirical

adj empírico
References in periodicals archive ?
That is the case when internal complexity means that the concept has some minimal empirical content.
The first phase of the project involves an empirical content analysis of political news from four television news broadcasts in Ireland, Spain, the Netherlands and Brazil.
Quine assigns the empirical content of theories to "observation categoricals.
The statements of logic and mathematics possess no empirical content.
specify the research question, highlight the theoretical framework and methods, summarise the empirical content and findings, and highlight the policy relevance;
The JCE is at the level of both the broad set of economics journals and the elite journals, but the JDE is an outlier with a much higher level of empirical content by far than all other comparison groups.
2) To know that a mental state with empirical content p is true at least partially amounts to knowing that it is not very likely that p is false (premise).
These authors argue that, to be considered a theory, a system must be stated in the form of law-like generalizations that include generalized conditionals, expressed in terms of operators of an if/then type; empirical content, susceptible of being tested for falseness as proposed by Popper in 1959; and nomic necessity, so that the occurrence of a particular phenomenon is causally related to some other phenomenon and does not happen merely by chance.
Presumably, at these points, Ishikawa has an audience in mind which may find the empirical content a distraction
As Kirdan Lees explains, the theoretical foundations and empirical content of KITT significantly advance our modelling towards the current frontier of central bank practice.
Quine's key argument against intentional psychology is that belief ascriptions have no determinate empirical content unless we take facts about linguistic meaning for granted, but meaning claims have no determinate empirical content unless we take belief for granted.
The author notes that this perception is in stark contrast to empirical content studies that demonstrate unequal ratios of clock time that favour male athletes.