empiricism

(redirected from Empirical science)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Empirical science: empirically, empiricism, Empirical observation

em·pir·i·cism

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

(ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that all knowledge of matters of fact derives from experience and that the mind is not furnished with a set of concepts in advance of experience. Compare intuitionism, rationalism
2. the use of empirical methods
3. (Medicine) medical quackery; charlatanism
emˈpiricist n, adj

em•pir•i•cism

(ɛmˈpɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. empirical method or practice.
2. the philosophic doctrine that all knowledge is derived from sense experience. Compare rationalism (def. 2).
3. undue reliance upon experience, as in medicine; quackery.
4. a conclusion that is arrived at empirically.
[1650–60]
em•pir′i•cist, n., adj.

empiricism

1. the doctrine that all ideas and categories are derived from sense experience and that knowledge cannot extend beyond experience, including observation, experiment, and induction.
2. an empirical method or practice. — empiricist, n.empirical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
a system of acquiring knowledge that rejects all o priori knowledge and relies solely upon observation, experimentation, and induction. Also empirism. — empiricist, n., adj. — empiric, empirical, adj.
See also: Knowledge

empiricism

The view that knowledge proceeds from experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empiricism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
British empiricism - the predominant philosophical tradition in Great Britain since the 17th century
experimentalism - an empirical doctrine that advocates experimental principles
logical positivism, positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.empiricism - the application of empirical methods in any art or science
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
3.empiricism - medical practice and advice based on observation and experience in ignorance of scientific findings
medical practice - the practice of medicine
Translations

empiricism

[emˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] Nempirismo m

empiricism

[ɪmˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] nempirisme m

empiricism

nEmpirismus m; (method) → Empirie f

empiricism

[ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzm] nempirismo
References in classic literature ?
He was not so much interested in surgery as in medicine, which, a more empirical science, offered greater scope to the imagination.
To put it bluntly: philosophy can clarify the world of the deworlded entities of empirical science. Hence, here lies a difference between philosophy and science which, according to Wheeler, must not be missed: a difference that is also an interplay between the two that clarifies as well how they relate to each other.
Some historians, such as Pierre Duhem, believe that the Condemnation of 1277 led to the development of empirical science, because it encouraged theologians and philosophers to criticize the natural history beliefs of classical philosophers such as Aristotle and to develop new ways of thinking.
Zahavi's introduction in this Handbook frames the transcendental dimension that he thinks is essential to phenomenology, a dimension without which, he suggests, one risks giving the game away to empirical science or other forms of philosophy.
Treharne has selected the most common questions that confront the atheist stance, question the moral character of atheists, doubt the explanations generated by empirical science, and defend religion.
With the rise of empirical science, formal and final causality cease to determine natural teleology.
"Empirical Science: New Frontier in Operations Management Research," Academy of Management Review, (16:4), 1991, pp.
Values and beliefs can't be completely distilled out of empirical science.
In a series of minibiographies, French demonstrates how physicians in specific social, occupational, economic, and political situations (from antiquity through the late eighteenth century) used and strengthened, or (later) weakened and discarded, the "Latin Medical Tradition." Moreover, plague and the coming of the "Great Pox" (as much as Harvey and Descartes) sped the movement toward medicine as an empirical science rather than a rational scientia.
We believe that empirical science can give us only a cognition of the works of God, but the deduction of God from His works is a matter of intellection or intuition.
However modern Linguistics, as a distinct empirical science, entailed that Arab linguists review their methods of dealing with the linguistic phenomenon.
Cabanis and Destutt de Tracy tended to represent the atheistic wing of the French Enlightenment (Helvetius and d'Holbach) in hoping that an empirical science might replace religion in moulding the values of a new generation of republicans.

Full browser ?