empiricism

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Related to Empiricists: rationalism

em·pir·i·cism

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. The view that experience, especially of the senses, is the only source of knowledge.
2.
a. Employment of empirical methods, as in science.
b. An empirical conclusion.
3. The practice of medicine that disregards scientific theory and relies solely on practical experience.

em·pir′i·cist n.

empiricism

(ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) philosophy the doctrine that all knowledge of matters of fact derives from experience and that the mind is not furnished with a set of concepts in advance of experience. Compare intuitionism, rationalism
2. the use of empirical methods
3. (Medicine) medical quackery; charlatanism
emˈpiricist n, adj

em•pir•i•cism

(ɛmˈpɪr əˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. empirical method or practice.
2. the philosophic doctrine that all knowledge is derived from sense experience. Compare rationalism (def. 2).
3. undue reliance upon experience, as in medicine; quackery.
4. a conclusion that is arrived at empirically.
[1650–60]
em•pir′i•cist, n., adj.

empiricism

1. the doctrine that all ideas and categories are derived from sense experience and that knowledge cannot extend beyond experience, including observation, experiment, and induction.
2. an empirical method or practice. — empiricist, n.empirical, adj.
See also: Philosophy
a system of acquiring knowledge that rejects all o priori knowledge and relies solely upon observation, experimentation, and induction. Also empirism. — empiricist, n., adj. — empiric, empirical, adj.
See also: Knowledge

empiricism

The view that knowledge proceeds from experience.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.empiricism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge derives from experience
British empiricism - the predominant philosophical tradition in Great Britain since the 17th century
experimentalism - an empirical doctrine that advocates experimental principles
logical positivism, positivism - the form of empiricism that bases all knowledge on perceptual experience (not on intuition or revelation)
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.empiricism - the application of empirical methods in any art or science
investigating, investigation - the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically
3.empiricism - medical practice and advice based on observation and experience in ignorance of scientific findings
medical practice - the practice of medicine
Translations

empiricism

[emˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] Nempirismo m

empiricism

[ɪmˈpɪrɪsɪzəm] nempirisme m

empiricism

nEmpirismus m; (method) → Empirie f

empiricism

[ɛmˈpɪrɪˌsɪzm] nempirismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Empiricists: Convinced that observation is our only tool against economic ignorance, empiricists are certain that the only defensible theoretical propositions are those derived from discerning patterns whereby changes in exogenous variables constantly precede changes in endogenous variables, thus establishing empirically (for example, through Granger tests) the direction of causality.
His classic writings argue that both in mathematics and in the physical sciences, scientists rely on hypotheses that are neither necessary first principles, as the rationalists claim, nor learned from experience, as the empiricists claim.
Foundationalist empiricists like myself agree that some things are self-evident, and agree that what is self-evident is knowledge.
One of several views of epistemology, the study of human knowledge, along with rationalism and skepticism, empiricism emphasizes the role of experience and evidence, especially sensory experience, in the formation of ideas, over the notion of innate ideas or traditions; empiricists may argue however that traditions (or customs) arise due to relations of previous sense experiences.
Edwards distances himself from the view of certain mystical empiricists who have maintained that human beings can have a direct, unmediated experience of God at certain privileged moments.
In the course of arriving at this view, Burbidge derives inspiration from thinkers as historically diverse as Frege, Descartes, Hegel, the British Empiricists, and the ancient Stoics, and challenges common presuppositions like the supposed subjectivity and solipsistic tendencies of thinking, and the ostensive atomism of individual thoughts.
Hegstead reconciles the invisible church of systematic theology with the visible church of empiricists and social scientists, showing that a sound theological interpretation of the church does not require the dichotomy.
The text seems to offer no middle ground for psychologists who are empiricists and might be interested in studying personhood from a broader perspective.
contributors to this volume, though not all principally empiricists,
The theologians seem genuinely eager for whatever lights both the hard and social sciences can contribute; and the scientists, while remaining empiricists, acknowledge that their role is "not about explaining away, but rather about exploring what else is going on in a reported encounter .
The works of empiricists attacked all areas of knowledge based on claims that were never grounded on particular observations and could not be verified through experience.
Indeed, Ms Duflo and Mr Banerjee, perhaps more than some of their disciples, are able theorists as well as thoroughgoing empiricists.