empiric

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empiric

a person who depends on experience or observation alone; a quack; charlatan
Not to be confused with:
empirical – verifiable: empirical evidence; practical; pragmatic; derived from or guided by experience or experiment
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

em·pir·ic

 (ĕm-pîr′ĭk)
n.
1. One who is guided by practical experience rather than precepts or theory.
2. An unqualified or dishonest practitioner; a charlatan.
adj.
Empirical.

[Latin empīricus, from Greek empeirikos, experienced, from empeiros, skilled : en-, in; see en-2 + peirān, to try (from peira, try, attempt; see per- in Indo-European roots).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

empiric

(ɛmˈpɪrɪk)
n
1. a person who relies on empirical methods
2. (Medicine) a medical quack; charlatan
adj
a variant of empirical
[C16: from Latin empīricus, from Greek empeirikos practised, from peiran to attempt]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

em•pir•ic

(ɛmˈpɪr ɪk)

n.
1. a person who is guided primarily by experience.
2. a quack; charlatan.
adj.
3. empirical.
[1520–30; < Latin empīricus < Greek empeirikós experienced <émpeir(os) practiced]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.empiric - relying on medical quackery; "empiric treatment"
archaicism, archaism - the use of an archaic expression
2.empiric - derived from experiment and observation rather than theory; "an empirical basis for an ethical theory"; "empirical laws"; "empirical data"; "an empirical treatment of a disease about which little is known"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

empiric

adj = empirical
nEmpiriker(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

em·pir·ic

a. empírico-a, que se basa en observaciones prácticas.
___ treatmenttratamento empírico.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
"There is another thing," murmured Mazarin; "there are empirics and charlatans.
Jones did not affect to consider Hiram Doolittle a perfect empiric in his profession, being in the constant habit of listening to his treatises on architecture with a kind of indulgent smile; yet, either from an inability to oppose them by anything plausible from his own stores of learning or from secret admiration, Richard generally submitted to the arguments of his co-adjutor.
He once more endeavored to pass the supposed empiric, scorning even the parade of threatening to use the knife, or tomahawk, that was pendent from his belt.