Emprison

Em`pris´on


v. t.1.See Imprison.
References in periodicals archive ?
But when the melancholy fit shall fall Sudden from heaven like a weeping cloud, That fosters the droop-headed flowers all, And hides the green hill in an April shroud; Then glut thy sorrow on a morning rose, Or on the rainbow of the salt sand-wave, Or on the wealth of globed peonies; Or if thy mistress some rich anger shows, Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave, And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes.
IN AN ESSAY CHASTISING TWENTIETH-CENTURY CRITICAL EFFORTS TO RECUPERATE Keats as a silenced radical, Paul Fry has remarked: Nor can the author of 'If thy mistress some rich anger shows, / Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave' ...
If Keats's aesthetic of acquisitive violence is inexplicit in the image of "globed peonies," it is unavoidable in the speaker's domination of his mistress: (51) "Emprison her soft hand, and let her rave, / And feed deep, deep upon her peerless eyes" (19-20).
emprisoned," finding himself suffering "wretchednesse" rather than power.
This pen name finds an echo not only in the name of the emprisoned writer in Makine's play but also in the message that the play shares with Makine's four other still not translated novels written under that second pen name before and after it.
In my foreign French environment, I have experienced how much hope these events created among people looking for liberation from the suffocating cage of traditional values, rituals, morals and practices that emprisoned them, and of the dominant elites that continued to present them as the only way to salvation.
Arnold Daghani (1909-1985) was a German-speaking Jew living in Romania who was emprisoned in the Mikhailowka labor camp upon the invasion of the Nazis.
The Durassian persona has totally merged her own identity with that of her emprisoned husband, whom she continually imagines as dying or dead.