EMS


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Ems

 (ĕmz, ĕms)
A river of northwest Germany flowing about 370 km (230 mi) to the North Sea at the Netherlands border.

EMS

abbr.
1. electrical muscle stimulation
2. Emergency Medical Service
3. European Monetary System

Ems

(ɛmz) or

Bad Ems

n
1. (Placename) a town in W Germany, in the Rhineland-Palatinate: famous for the Ems Telegram (1870), Bismarck's dispatch that led to the outbreak of the Franco-Prussian War. Pop: 9666 (2003 est)
2. (Placename) a river in W Germany, rising in the Teutoburger Wald and flowing generally north to the North Sea. Length: about 370 km (230 miles)

EMS

abbreviation for
1. (Economics) European Monetary System
2. (Computer Science) enhanced messaging service: a system used for sending text messages containing special text formatting, animations, etc, to and from mobile phones

EMS

emergency medical service.
Translations

EMS

N ABBR =European Monetary SystemSME m

EMS

[ˌiːɛmˈɛs] n abbr (=European Monetary System) → SME m

EMS

abbr of European Monetary SystemEWS nt

EMS

[ˌiːɛmˈɛs] n abbr =European Monetary SystemS.M.E. m =Sistema Monetario Europeo
References in classic literature ?
Uncle Henry and Aunt Em had a big bed in one corner, and Dorothy a little bed in another corner.
When Aunt Em came there to live she was a young, pretty wife.
There's a cyclone coming, Em," he called to his wife.
Aunt Em, badly frightened, threw open the trap door in the floor and climbed down the ladder into the small, dark hole.
I was for leaven' 'em alone--I was never much for reading--but ole Higgins he must touch em.
Dorothy Gale lived on a farm in Kansas, with her Aunt Em and her Uncle Henry.
He was a good man, and worked in the field as hard as he could; and Aunt Em did all the housework, with Dorothy's help.
Aunt Em once said she thought the fairies must have marked Dorothy at her birth, because she had wandered into strange places and had always been protected by some unseen power.
So he told his wife, Aunt Em, of his trouble, and she first cried a little and then said that they must be brave and do the best they could, and go away somewhere and try to earn an honest living.
They did not tell their niece the sad news for several days, not wishing to make her unhappy; but one morning the little girl found Aunt Em softly crying while Uncle Henry tried to comfort her.
Finally, Aunt Em said, with another sigh of regret:
Why, Tom,' I used to say, `when your gals takes on and cry, what's the use o' crackin on' em over the head, and knockin' on 'em round?