plein air

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Related to En plein air: synthetism, Japonisme

plein air

or plein-air  (plān′âr′, plĕ-nĕr′)
adj.
1. Of or being a style of painting produced out of doors in natural light.
2. Taking place outdoors: plein air dining.

[From French (en) plein air, (in) the open air : en, in + plein, full + air, air.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
"Les camps de deplaces sont surpeuples, et beaucoup de gens sont obliges de s'installer en plein air", ajoute le communique d'Ocha.
Comme a l'accoutumee des projections en plein air sont programmees dans une ambiance cinematographique estivale et conviviale.
The sketches - many done en plein air - are, by their very nature, fresh and vigorous, and demonstrate the artist's deft, light touch, with washes of colour making them vibrant and vivid.
Michael Ashcroft, from Leyland, Lancashire, is exhibiting a series of works painted "en plein air" on a trip to Venice.
In "Colors of the West" she draws upon her impressive artistic abilities to explores wild places through the lens of watercolor 'en plein air' painting, a French term meaning literally in the open air.
Original watercolors grace the wall -- courtesy of a "painter in residence" program that commissions artists to imagine the park "en plein air." "People don't want to leave," confides attendant Antionette Smalls, who will clock seven years on the job this December.
The CGI worlds of Sondra Perry's IT'S IN THE GAME '17 or Mirror Gag for Vitrine and Projection, 2017, and Jacolby Satterwhite's En Plein Air: Music of Objective Romance, 2016-, acutely demonstrate the emancipation of imagination from physics at opposite ends of the scale: reproduction of real-life power structures versus a baroque actualization of desire.
The group also paints together, participating in such well-known styles as en plein air painting, in-studio painting, and demonstrations."
The rise of painting en plein air was a key change in French artistic practice in the 19th century.
Each of the paintings was executed en plein air (on-site) along the route of the river, using Winsor Newton paints with water from the river on pressed watercolor paper.