enclosure

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en·clo·sure

 (ĕn-klō′zhər)
n.
1.
a. The act of enclosing.
b. The state of being enclosed.
2. Something enclosed: a business letter with a supplemental enclosure.
3. Something that encloses.

enclosure

(ɪnˈkləʊʒə) or

inclosure

n
1. the act of enclosing or state of being enclosed
2. a region or area enclosed by or as if by a fence
3. (Agriculture)
a. the act of appropriating land, esp common land, by putting a hedge or other barrier around it
b. history such acts as were carried out at various periods in England, esp between the 12th and 14th centuries and finally in the 18th and 19th centuries
4. a fence, wall, etc, that serves to enclose
5. something, esp a supporting document, enclosed within an envelope or wrapper, esp together with a letter
6. Brit a section of a sports ground, racecourse, etc, allotted to certain spectators

en•clo•sure

(ɛnˈkloʊ ʒər)

n.
1. something that encloses, as a fence or wall.
2. an enclosed area, esp. a tract of land surrounded by a fence.
3. something enclosed or included, as within a letter.
4. an act or instance of enclosing; the state of being enclosed.
[1530–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enclosure - a structure consisting of an area that has been enclosed for some purpose
area - a part of a structure having some specific characteristic or function; "the spacious cooking area provided plenty of room for servants"
cage, coop - an enclosure made or wire or metal bars in which birds or animals can be kept
cargo area, cargo deck, cargo hold, storage area, hold - the space in a ship or aircraft for storing cargo
catchall - an enclosure or receptacle for odds and ends
chamber - a natural or artificial enclosed space
compound - an enclosure of residences and other building (especially in the Orient)
dock - an enclosure in a court of law where the defendant sits during the trial
echo chamber - an enclosed space for producing reverberation of a sound
lock chamber, lock - enclosure consisting of a section of canal that can be closed to control the water level; used to raise or lower vessels that pass through it
nacelle - a streamlined enclosure for an aircraft engine
pen - an enclosure for confining livestock
pit - an enclosure in which animals are made to fight
playpen, pen - a portable enclosure in which babies may be left to play
plenum - an enclosed space in which the air pressure is higher than outside
dog pound, pound - a public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs; "unlicensed dogs will be taken to the pound"
niche, recess - an enclosure that is set back or indented
vivarium - an indoor enclosure for keeping and raising living animals and plants and observing them under natural conditions
yard - an enclosure for animals (as chicken or livestock)
2.enclosure - the act of enclosing something inside something else
intromission, insertion, introduction - the act of putting one thing into another
boxing, packing - the enclosure of something in a package or box
encasement, incasement - the act of enclosing something in a case
3.enclosure - a naturally enclosed space
cavern - any large dark enclosed space; "his eyes were dark caverns"
matrix - an enclosure within which something originates or develops (from the Latin for womb)
space - an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth"
4.enclosure - something (usually a supporting document) that is enclosed in an envelope with a covering letter
document, papers, written document - writing that provides information (especially information of an official nature)

enclosure

noun compound, yard, pen, fold, ring, paddock, pound, coop, sty, stockade This enclosure was so vast that the outermost wall could hardly be seen.

enclosure

noun
An area partially or entirely enclosed by walls or buildings:
Translations
تَطْويق، إحاطَهحَظيرَهشَيءٌ مُرْفَق
bilagindelukkeindhegning
liite
bekerítés
fylgiskjalgirîingumgirt svæîi
ohradenieohradený pozemok

enclosure

[ɪnˈkləʊʒəʳ] N
1. (= act) → cercamiento m
2. (= place) → recinto m; (at racecourse) → reservado m
3. (in letter) → anexo m

enclosure

[ɪnˈkləʊʒər] n
[land] → enceinte f royal enclosure, winner's enclosure
(in letter)annexe f, pièce f jointe

enclosure

n
(= ground enclosed)eingezäuntes Grundstück or Feld, Einfriedung f; (for animals) → Gehege nt; the enclosure (on racecourse) → der Zuschauerbereich
(act) → Einzäunung f, → Einfried(ig)ung f (geh)
(= fence etc)Umzäunung f; enclosure wallUmfassungsmauer f
(= document etc enclosed)Anlage f

enclosure

[ɪnˈkləʊʒəʳ] n (act) → recinzione f; (place) → recinto; (at racecourse) → tondino; (in letter) → allegato

enclose

(inˈkləuz) verb
1. to put inside a letter or its envelope. I enclose a cheque for $4.00.
2. to shut in. The garden was enclosed by a high wall.
enˈclosure (-ʒə) noun
1. the act of enclosing.
2. land surrounded by a fence or wall. He keeps a donkey in that enclosure.
3. something put in along with a letter. I received your enclosure with gratitude.
References in periodicals archive ?
Many such working class groups had sprung up to challenge the enclosure movement through the simple act of walking, and in 1931 they came together to form the National Council of the Ramblers.
The report covers the ocean enclosure movement, narrow international ocean waterways, ocean navigation routes of particular importance to the US, transit regions of the world, and a regime of navigational inconsistencies for the coming decade and its potential impacts on US interests.
See also James Boyle, "The Second Enclosure Movement and the Construction of the Public Domain" (2003) 66:2 Law & Contemp Probs 33 at 51 [Boyle, "Second Enclosure Movement"].
2003): "The Second Enclosure Movement and the Construction of the Public Domain", Law and Contemporary Problems, 66, pp.
This is part of the biggest legalised theft of public property since the enclosure movement deprived people of the countryside of their common rights 250 years ago.
Research about the enclosure movement in England has shown that common lands managed by the village communities were the rule.
1) During the fifteenth century, the first enclosure movement in the United Kingdom intensified.
For instance, on page 217 we read that the late-medieval enclosure movement in England meant that 'the peasants, divided and impoverished, flocked to the cities as cheap manpower, which helped to create the nascent industrial enterprises of the British Isles.
And Linebaugh makes clear that despite the enclosure movement the principles of commoning and the right to subsistence were never eradicated but have continually been rearticulated throughout the long Anglo-American experience, including Kett's Rebellion in 1549 which took aim against enclosure and led to thousands of rebels living in campsites throughout England, the "forty acres and a mule" policy briefly instituted by General William Sherman in the aftermath of the Civil War, and generations of Native Americans who have defended communal land ownership.
The author sees the enclosure movement as the primary reason for this shift in the role of gardens, as the conceiving of previously communal land as private family property meant that large sections of England's land were for private use and private profit.
According to the author, an oppositional discourse has emerged within the fields of law and public policy, concerning the privatization, or "enclosure," of ideas--analogous to the land enclosure movement in 16th century England--and the expansion of intellectual property rights, resulting in the "fencing off" of the intellectual commons.
Dan Leighton Reclaiming the new commons A new politics of the commons David Bollier The second enclosure movement James Boyle The peer-to-peer revolution Michel Bauwens Social democracy and anti-capitalist theory Jeremy Gilbert The commons, the state and transformative politics Hilary Wainwright Interview A multitude of possibilities Michael Hardt interviewed by Dan Leighton Squeezing middle England Death and taxes Martin O'Neil The Anxious Affluent John Harris Notebook An appreciation of Richard Rorty James Crabtree Reviews Naomi Klein reviewed by David Floyd Benjamin Barber reviewed by Michael Calderbank Doreen Massey reviewed by Max Nathan