Endable

End´a`ble


a.1.That may be ended; terminable.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using specifically the work of Jane Austin, who never married, and William Wordsworth, who did, Walker argues that the era just after the Napoleonic wars was a time of readjustment in the idea of marriage, from sacramental and inviolate to companionable and, if not, possibly endable. He feels that neither Austin nor Wordsworth were pro- or anti-marriage, but that, along with many, the institution puzzled them and that, especially in later work, both searched for an adequate explanation through their work.
This makes AFATDS a cornerstone program to endable the tenets o "net-centric" warfare, according to Hom.
In the context of a life, the attachment of the holy to the so-called "ordinary" allows Buber to say, "look again, the ordinary is without an endable depth in holiness." And each individual realizes this unendable depth in himself whenever he has an I-Thou encounter.