taking

(redirected from Endangered Species Act)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

tak·ing

 (tā′kĭng)
adj.
1. Capturing interest; fetching: a taking smile.
2. Contagious; catching. Used of an infectious disease.
n.
1. The act of one that takes.
2. Something taken, as a catch of fish.
3. Law An action by a government, especially under the power of eminent domain, that deprives a private owner of real property or of the use and enjoyment of that property.
4. takings Informal Receipts, especially of money.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

taking

(ˈteɪkɪŋ)
adj
1. charming, fascinating, or intriguing
2. informal infectious; catching
n
3. something taken
4. (Commerce) (plural) receipts; the income earned, taken, or received by a shop, business, etc
ˈtakingly adv
ˈtakingness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

tak•ing

(ˈteɪ kɪŋ)

n.
1. the act of a person or thing that takes.
2. an action by the federal government, as a regulatory ruling, that imposes a restriction on the use of private property for which the owner must be compensated.
3. takings, money earned or gained.
adj.
4. captivating; pleasing: taking ways.
[1300–50]
tak′ing•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.taking - the act of someone who picks up or takes something; "the pickings were easy"; "clothing could be had for the taking"
action - something done (usually as opposed to something said); "there were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
Adj.1.taking - very attractive; capturing interest; "a fetching new hairstyle"; "something inexpressibly taking in his manner"; "a winning personality"
attractive - pleasing to the eye or mind especially through beauty or charm; "a remarkably attractive young man"; "an attractive personality"; "attractive clothes"; "a book with attractive illustrations"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

taking

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ]
A. ADJ (= attractive) → atractivo
B. N (Mil) [of town] → toma f, conquista f; [of hostages] → toma f
the job's yours for the takingel trabajo es tuyo si lo quieres
the match was theirs for the takingtenían el partido prácticamente ganado
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

taking

n
it’s yours for the takingdas können Sie (umsonst) haben
takings pl (Comm) → Einnahmen pl
(Mil, of town) → Einnahme f, → Eroberung f
(old: = distress) → Aufregung f, → Erregung f; to be in a takingaufgeregt or erregt sein
adj manners, wayseinnehmend, gewinnend; personsympathisch, anziehend

taking

:
taking away
nWegnahme f
taking over
nÜbernahme f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

taking

[ˈteɪkɪŋ] adj (attractive) → accattivante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
WASHINGTON -- The Trump administration moved on Monday to weaken how it applies the 45-year-old Endangered Species Act, ordering changes that critics said will speed the loss of animals and plants at a time of record global extinctions.
American wildlife officials have said they would officially consider listing the giraffe as an endangered species, a move long sought by conservationists alarmed by the African mammal's precipitous decline and a growing domestic market for giraffe products.The US Fish and Wildlife Service said on Thursday that it had found "substantial information" that listing giraffes as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act "may be warranted.
Focus: Statutory Interpretation Endangered Species Act
And it is because of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) that we can celebrate this victory.
This reference guide provides information on engendered species and the Endangered Species Act. It details the history and background on the topic, including evolution and biodiversity, conservation, major points in the Endangered Species Act, and its history and legal battles, then issues that affect endangered species and the controversy surrounding the Endangered Species Act, including environmental skepticism, global warming, species in rapid decline, statesAE rights, and examples of the gray wolf and greater sage-grouse as different approaches to dealing with species protection.
The (https://www.fws.gov/endangered/laws-policies/esa.html) Endangered Species Act (ESA), passed in 1973, goes further than just identifying imperiled species.
Then, in 1973, President Nixon signed the Endangered Species Act into law.
will protect lions in Africa under the Endangered Species Act, the Obama administration announced Monday, a move that would make it harder for American big-game hunters to bring a lion head or hide into the country, AP reported.
Jeb Bush is leading an alliance of 23 state land commissioners in a charge against the Endangered Species Act, calling for more transparency on how animals are added to the federal endangered list.
The piping plover was listed under both the Federal Endangered Species Act and the Massachusetts Endangered Species Act previously.
-- Republicans in Congress on Tuesday called for an overhaul to the Endangered Species Act to curtail environmentalists' lawsuits and give more power to states, but experts say broad changes to one of the nation's cornerstone environmental laws are unlikely given the pervasive partisan divide in Washington, D.C.

Full browser ?