enemy combatant


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enemy combatant

Any person in an armed conflict who could be properly detained under the laws and customs of war. Also called EC.
References in periodicals archive ?
Writing for the Court, Justice O'Connor noted, "The Government has never provided any court with the full criteria that it uses in classifying individuals as [enemy combatants]" but still accepted the government's position that the Authorization for the Use of Military Force gave the president the power to detain enemy combatants. Nevertheless, the Court held that "a citizen-detainee seeking to challenge his classification as an enemy combatant must receive notice of the factual basis for his classification, and a fair opportunity to rebut the Government's factual assertions before a neutral decision-maker." (12) Shortly after the decision was announced, the government released Hamdi on the condition that he renounce his American citizenship and return to live in Saudi Arabia.
This changed with the Supreme Court's decisions in the Enemy Combatant Cases of 2004.
Wright (1) is the most recent case in the struggle to define who qualifies as an enemy combatant in the Global War on Terror.
Wright, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals (Richmond) spoke on the president's power to take civilians on American soil into custody as "enemy combatants" and detain them without access to courts, arguing the president cannot label an alien legally on American soil an "enemy combatant" and place him in military custody indefinitely.
A year later, Begg co-authored a memoir called Enemy Combatant: a British Muslim's Journey to Guantanamo and Back.
Possibly the most sinister of all these proto-totalitarian measures, this act would impose military domination over civil institutions and civilian life, and could ultimately target anyone as an "illegal enemy combatant" to be dealt with accordingly.
Part II explains how CSRTs depart from that tradition and why their enemy combatant determinations cannot be used to rebut the Geneva Conventions' presumption of POW status.
citizen--an enemy combatant and to deprive that person of basic due process rights to challenge his or her detention in court.
government's reasons for calling him an enemy combatant.--Dave Gilson
Not surprisingly, enemy combatant detainees, through friends of court, soon filed petitions for writ of habeas corpus in federal court to review the legality of their detention as enemy combatants.
A soldier aims across the battlefield at an enemy combatant. She pulls the trigger, and a laser beam from her rifle zaps a sensor on her target's Uniform.
THE DAY THE Supreme Court handed down what have collectively become known as the enemy combatant cases--June 28, 2004--was both widely anticipated and widely received as a legal moment of truth for the Bush administration's war on terrorism.