English-speaker


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Translations

English-speaker

[ˈɪŋglɪʃˌspiːkəʳ] nanglofono/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Imagine if an English-speaker made a protest about housebuilding in English-speaking areas, claiming that they could attract people with an alien culture.
I AM surely the only English-speaker in Wales today who will have welcomed the quite unbelievable comments of John Elfed Jones.
As an English-speaker, I have never come across this mythical "specially privileged Welsh-speaker'".
An English-speaker can go to places as far apart as Alaska or New Zealand and their language and culture are secure.
But while English-speakers struggle when it comes to describing smells - a finding some believe reflects smell's role as the sensory poor relation - researchers say recent work with the Jahai hunter-gatherer community shows not all humans struggle.
This is in line with the mindset of countless educators who believe, incorrectly, that children who are not native English-speakers need the special accommodation of being immersed in their native language in order to learn.
You all chorus on about S4C not giving you English-speakers any time, and as soon as they do you backtrack like scalded rabbits.
Underlying the period was a view which now guides (or misdirects) American planners, that English-speakers have a mission to civilise.
The Book Of Tea was in fact written in English, in order to prove accessible to English-speakers, and presents chanoyu (literally "the way of tea") as a spiritual culture and a ritual that interlaces with the "Art of Life" itself.
A CROP survey of more than 3,000 English speaking and Francophone Quebecers reports that in the western part of Montreal (where the province's largest concentration of Anglophones are found) 55% of English-speakers of the sample said they were generally satisfied with access, while only 39% felt the same way in Montreal's largely French-speaking east end.
Some English-speakers claim French is the most beautiful language.
Many Welsh-speaking parents in the late 19th and early 20th centuries chose to bring up their children as monoglot English-speakers and this resulted in a whole generation being deprived of the language and the host of cultural and social benefits that go with it.