enharmonic

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en·har·mon·ic

 (ĕn′här-mŏn′ĭk)
adj. Music
Of, relating to, or involving tones that are identical in pitch but are written differently according to the key in which they occur, as C sharp and D flat, for example.

[Late Latin enharmonicus, from Greek enarmonios : en-, in; see en-2 + harmoniā, harmony; see harmony.]

en′har·mon′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

enharmonic

(ˌɛnhɑːˈmɒnɪk)
adj
1. (Music, other) denoting or relating to a small difference in pitch between two notes such as A flat and G sharp: not present in instruments of equal temperament such as the piano, but significant in the intonation of stringed and wind instruments
2. (Music, other) denoting or relating to enharmonic modulation
[C17: from Latin enharmonicus, from Greek enarmonios, from en-2 + harmonia; see harmony]
ˌenharˈmonically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

en•har•mon•ic

(ˌɛn hɑrˈmɒn ɪk)

adj.
having the same pitch in the tempered scale but written in different notation, as G sharp and A flat.
[1590–1600; < Late Latin enharmonicus < Greek enarmónios (-icus replacing -ios) =en- en-1 + harmónios harmonious]
en`har•mon′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, as several writers--myself included--have pointed out, certain passages are much enriched by the use of such a temperament, most notably the chromatic succession of alternating major thirds and diminished fourths near the end of the seventh toccata, since the difference between the consonances and the enharmonically equivalent dissonances becomes almost painfully audible.