Ennius


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En·ni·us

 (ĕn′ē-əs), Quintus 239-169 bc.
Roman poet. His works, including plays, annals, and satires, greatly influenced later authors but survive today only in fragments.

Ennius

(ˈɛnɪəs)
n
(Biography) Quintus (ˈkwɪntəs). 239–169 bc, Roman epic poet and dramatist
References in periodicals archive ?
Cicero, On Duties 1.61 (citing Ennius), 1.7.21; Tusculan Disputations
Fragmentary Republican Latin; Volume II: Ennius: Dramatic Fragments Minor Works
Later, Latin playwrights Ennius, Pacuvius, Naevius, and Accius all wrote tragedies, now lost, that appear to have dramatized some aspect of the Orestes mythos.
Acosta-Hughes; Stephens (2012, p.254) "to Ennius to Propertius, Virgil's recollection of Callimachus' dream, in which Gallus is imagined on Helicon and there initiated by the Muses (Ecl.
As in the case of Vergil, who was 'acquitted' of being obnoxiously obscure in the fourth book of the Aeneid by Servius' vouching for his borrowings of Euripides, Ennius et alii, so poetry composed in the vernacular languages underwent an equivalent process of ongoing authentication in the 16 and 17th centuries.
Interestingly enough, Telamon was the titular character of the tragedy Telamo by Roman poet Quintus Ennius (239-169 BCE), of which only a few fragments survive.
(47.) As Callebat (2004, 62) observes, Vitruvius here participates in a literary convention in which Latin authors, including Ennius, Cicero, Virgil, and Ovid, expressed the desire and expectation to live on through their work.
Petrarch offers his services as scribe to the cause, as the poet to his prince, the Ennius to his Scipio.
History of Latin Literature from Ennius to Boethius, 2 vols.
Rappelons aussi qu'Ennius (Ann., 558 [Vahl.sup.2]; cf.
Who has such a hatred, one might almost say, for the very name of Roman, as to despise and reject the Medea of Ennius or the Antiope of Pacuvius, and give as his reason that though he enjoys the corresponding plays of Euripides he cannot endure books written in Latin?" (5-7).
The availability of the Roman public to comedy, a genre contiguous with the full range of entertainment shows, naturalizes this theatrical species unlike the tragedy, for whose implementation took Rome a whole educational labor (the first Roman tragic authors, Andronicus, Naevius, Ennius, Pacuvius, Atticus were scholars and translators of Greek tragedies and their attempts remained at the stage of adaptations).