enthalpy

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en·thal·py

 (ĕn′thăl′pē, ĕn-thăl′-)
n. pl. en·thal·pies
Symbol H A thermodynamic function of a system, equivalent to the sum of the internal energy of the system plus the product of its volume multiplied by the pressure exerted on it by its surroundings.

[Greek enthalpein, to heat in (en-, in; see en-2 + thalpein, to heat) + -y.]

enthalpy

(ˈɛnθəlpɪ; ɛnˈθæl-)
n
(General Physics) a thermodynamic property of a system equal to the sum of its internal energy and the product of its pressure and volume. Symbol: H Also called: heat content or total heat
[C20: from Greek enthalpein to warm in, from en-2 + thalpein to warm]

en•thal•py

(ˈɛn θæl pi, ɛnˈθæl-)

n., pl. -pies.
a quantity associated with a thermodynamic system, expressed as the internal energy of a system plus the product of the pressure and volume of the system.
[1925–30; < Greek enthálp(ein) to warm in (en- en-2 + thálpein to warm)]

en·thal·py

(ĕn′thăl′pē)
The amount of energy contained in a system.

enthalpy

A measure of the stored heat energy contained in a substance.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enthalpy - (thermodynamics) a thermodynamic quantity equal to the internal energy of a system plus the product of its volume and pressureenthalpy - (thermodynamics) a thermodynamic quantity equal to the internal energy of a system plus the product of its volume and pressure; "enthalpy is the amount of energy in a system capable of doing mechanical work"
physical property - any property used to characterize matter and energy and their interactions
thermodynamics - the branch of physics concerned with the conversion of different forms of energy
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a positive influence causes an enthalpy change rises from the breach of hydrogen bonds from self-associating molecules [42].
The denaturation temperature (Td) and enthalpy change (IHd) were determined from the maximal peak temperature and the area of the peak, respectively.
The Gibb's free energy IGo is related to the enthalpy change (IHo) and entropy change (ISo) at a constant temperature by the Van't Hoff equation as shown below:
The soft-segment melting temperature ([T.sub.m]), soft-segment crystallization temperature ([T.sub.c]), enthalpy change for melting ([DELTA][H.sub.m]), and enthalpy change for crystallization ([DELTA][H.sub.c]) were reported by the Platinum[TM] software in the DSC instrument.
For a better understanding of the effect of the magnitude of the mass flow on the loss distribution in each component of the compressor system, the enthalpy rise from the flow inlet to the respective separating surface in relation to the entire enthalpy change is shown in Figure 7.
The enthalpy change is calculated from the slope of the van't Hoff relationship.
[12], paraffin melts at a temperature of 41 to 75[degrees]C, overall enthalpy change is between 228 and 169 J/g, thermal conductivity is between 0.19 and 0.21 W/mK, and change in volume when melted reaches 14.8%.
In this work we report measurement of dependence of Open Circuit Voltage (OCV) on temperature and the entropy and enthalpy change associated with the free energy of lithium intercalation in the structure of an experimental carbon.
The standard enthalpy change ([DELTA][H.sup.[theta]]) and standard entropy change ([DELTA][S.sup.[theta]]) can be calculated by the thermodynamic equation
In this work we determined the immersion enthalpy, [DELTA][H.sub.im], of the carbonaceous adsorbent materials in aqueous Ni(II) solutions of different concentrations and calculate the relationship of mass of Ni(II) with respect to the system mass, [X.sub.Ni(II)], and the enthalpy change by [micro]g of ion Ni(II), [DELTA][H.sub.exp], from which we calculate the change in the differential enthalpy of Ni(II) in the mixture, [mathematical expression not reproducible].
[C.sub.p] is a fundamental property derived from other thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy change ([DELTA]H) and entropy change ([DELTA]S), defined as follows (equations 1 by invoking the Kirchhoff equation) (PIRES et al., 2009; PRIVALOV, 2015):