entheogen


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Related to entheogen: ayahuasca

en·the·o·gen

 (ĕn-thē′ō-jən)
n.
A psychoactive substance, usually one derived from plants or fungi but also from the secretions of animals such as toads, that is ingested by a shaman or another participant in a ritual in order to produce visions or gain mystical insight.

[Greek entheos, possessed; see enthusiasm + -gen.]

en·the′o·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rather, it is the quintessential entheogen, a plant said to provide access to the God within.
The purpose of the experiment was to test the drug's reliability as an entheogen (a psychoactive chemical.
Thousands of supporters have signed up to support the campaign run by the Entheogen Defence Fund.
LSD is used mainly as an entheogen, recreational drug, and as an agent in psychedelic therapy.
Ayahuasca, classifiable as an entheogen, is a psychoactive brew originating in the Amazon Basin region of South America.
Amanita muscaria is a special example of such drugs, being both a potential entheogen and cited as a medicinal herb in rejuvenating therapy (rasayana) with its effects described as hallucinogenic and stimulating the nervous system, invoking "vivid dreams" and "recollections of old memories and supernatural feelings (Puri 2003, 1977).
Using an entheogen is not a matter of becoming healthier or even wiser.
Magic mushrooms: From sacred entheogen to Class A Drug.
The addition of other psychoactive substances, like the kundur incense mentioned in Shia Islamic hadith, which combines frankincense and the entheogen Peganum harmala (Flattery & Schwartz 1989), would obviously synergize and potentiate the effects with inhalation of MAO-Inhibiting b-carbolines.
1996; BD 1994; BF 1994; Anonymous 1993; Ott 1976; Pollock 1975), newspaper articles (Seattle Times 2006), toxicology reports (Beug 2007, 2006; Cochran 2000, 1999, 1985; Trestrail 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995) and various websites (Erowid 2009; Lycaeum 2010; Tolento 2008) and forums (Drugs Forum 2010; Entheogen Dot Com 2010; Mycotopia 2010; Shroomery 2010).
recent clinical studies of the therapeutic effects of entheogens
They work with prayer and ceremony, with plant medicines, and some with spirit-opening entheogens like ayahuasca, peyote, and mushrooms.