feedback inhibition

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feedback inhibition

n.
A cellular control mechanism in which an enzyme that catalyzes the production of a particular substance in the cell is inhibited when that substance has accumulated to a certain level, thereby balancing the amount provided with the amount needed.
References in periodicals archive ?
The assignment is divided into the following lots: Lot 1: Amoxicillin with enzyme inhibitor for intravenous use.
We aimed to identify how often AE is associated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI-AE) therapy and whether the severity of AE episodes in these patients differs from the severity of idiopathic AE.
Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor associated angioedema.
The cream is an enzyme inhibitor and works by blocking an enzyme necessary for hair to grow.
The researchers also found an enzyme inhibitor, oxamate - known to reduce LDHA activity - operated in the same manner: It also disrupted the metabolic system of pancreatic cancer cells.
The researchers also found an enzyme inhibitor oxamate, which is known to reduce LDHA activity, operated in the same manner.
Researchers also found that an enzyme inhibitor, oxamate, which is known to reduce LDHA activity, also disrupted the pancreatic cancer cells metabolic system.
The researchers also found an enzyme inhibitor, oxamate, which is known to reduce LDHA activity, operated in the same manner: It also disrupted the pancreatic cancer cells metabolic system.
Gradman and colleagues in their multicenter, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of factorial design evaluated the safety and efficacy of combination treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor, enalapril, and the vascular selective calcium antagonist felodipine extended release (ER) in patients with essential hypertension.
We previously reported that the combined treatment of vitamin K2 (VK) and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ACE-I) significantly suppressed the experimental hepatocarcinogenesis.
A potential immunotherapy, a new gene therapy, an enzyme inhibitor, and a compound originally isolated from a Chinese herb are among the latest approaches scientists are proposing to treat addiction.
Lead researcher Dr Gerd Wagner, from the University of East Anglia, said: "This exciting discovery of a potent enzyme inhibitor with a completely new mechanism of action has considerable therapeutic potential in cancer, inflammation and infection.