Ermanaric

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Ermanaric

(əˈmænərɪk)
n
(Biography) died ?375 ad, king of the Ostrogoths: ruled an extensive empire in eastern Europe, which was overrun by the Huns in the 370s
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References in periodicals archive ?
others, including those destroyed by someone called Eormanric and his
(26) <B COBEDE><R 5.110.16> Woes [??]es ilca ce[??]elbehrt Eormanrices sunu was this same Edelberth, Eormanric's son 'He was the aforementioned Edelberth, Eormanric's son' (27) <B COCHAD><R 76> Se ilca Owine wes munuc micelre geearnunge the same Owen was monk with great merit 'The aforementioned Owen was a monk of great merit' Both ilca and self appear emphatically with proper names, whereas personal pronouns require self, both in reflexive and emphatic use, as in (28) and (29):
The ruler whom Widsith singles out for special attention is Eormanric (or Ermanaric),(3) the legendary king of the Goths, who commands ambiguous attention as both a magnificent host and a waerloga, or "oath-breaker."(4) Despite this uneasy mix of praise and blame, Eormanric stands out as a grand figure suggestive of the idealized archetypal king of former times, just as Widsith is the idealized bard who is imagined to have entertained him.
Just as the Exeter Book gnomes confirm the natural order of the world by naming its elements and their properties-forst sceal freosan, fyr wudu meltan (frost has the property of freezing, fire consumes wood)(45)--so the poet of Widsith makes unarguable claims about the social order by naming the peoples of the earth and identifying their most famous rulers: AEtla weold Hunum, Eormanric Gotum (Attila ruled the Huns, Eormanric the Goths, 18).
There is no surprise in this triumph, for it is this tribe, as Chambers remarks, that "had done or suffered so much that their heroes became household names" throughout German-speaking areas of Europe.(49) The poet names either the Goths or Eormanric no fewer than five separate times.
(88-102) And I was with Eormanric all the time; there the king of the Goths rewarded me bountifully.
First: why does mention of Eormanric lead directly to mention of the generous queen Ealhhild?
Widsith states that it was in the company of Ealhhild, that faelre freopuwebban (gracious peace-weaver, 6a), that he first travelled to Eormanric's court eastan of Ongle (from the east, from Angeln, 8a).