ephemeral

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Related to Ephemeral lake: Ephemeral river

ephemeral

lasting a short time; transitory; short-lived: It was an ephemeral but delightful visit.
Not to be confused with:
ethereal – intangible; delicate; heavenly; spiritual: It was an ethereal visitation by someone from another world.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

e·phem·er·al

 (ĭ-fĕm′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Lasting for a markedly brief time: "There remain some truths too ephemeral to be captured in the cold pages of a court transcript" (Irving R. Kaufman).
2. Having a short lifespan or a short annual period of aboveground growth. Used especially of plants.
n.
Something, especially a plant, that is ephemeral.

[From Greek ephēmeros : ep-, epi-, epi- + hēmerā, day.]

e·phem′er·al′i·ty, e·phem′er·al·ness n.
e·phem′er·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ephemeral

(ɪˈfɛmərəl)
adj
lasting for only a short time; transitory; short-lived: ephemeral pleasure.
n
1. (Biology) a short-lived organism, such as the mayfly
2. (Botany) a plant that completes its life cycle in less than one year, usually less than six months
[C16: from Greek ephēmeros lasting only a day, from hēmera day]
eˈphemerally adv
eˌphemerˈality, eˈphemeralness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•phem•er•al

(ɪˈfɛm ər əl)

adj.
1. lasting a very short time; short-lived; transitory.
2. lasting but one day: an ephemeral flower.
n.
3. anything short-lived, as certain insects.
[1570–80; < Greek ephḗmer(os) short-lived, lasting but a day]
e•phem′er•al•ly, adv.
e•phem`er•al′i•ty, e•phem′er•al•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ephemeral - anything short-lived, as an insect that lives only for a day in its winged form
insect - small air-breathing arthropod
Adj.1.ephemeral - lasting a very short time; "the ephemeral joys of childhood"; "a passing fancy"; "youth's transient beauty"; "love is transitory but it is eternal"; "fugacious blossoms"
impermanent, temporary - not permanent; not lasting; "politics is an impermanent factor of life"- James Thurber; "impermanent palm cottages"; "a temperary arrangement"; "temporary housing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ephemeral

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

ephemeral

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
hetkellinenlyhytaikainenohimenevä
efemerankratkotrajanprivremen
efemeryczny

ephemeral

[ɪˈfemərəl] ADJefímero
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ephemeral

[ɪˈfɛmərəl] adjéphémère
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ephemeral

adjephemer (geh, Zool), → kurzlebig; happiness alsoflüchtig
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ephemeral

[ɪˈfɛmərl] adjeffimero/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ephemeral

a. efímero-a, pasajero-a.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
After spending hours studying aerial photographs, I finally found what looked like a secluded, ephemeral lake bottom on the Tennessee Tombigbee Waterway in north-central Mississippi.
Russell (1883, 1885) used the terms playa and playa lake as synonymous, associated to "...mud plains derived from ephemeral lake bodies that received markings that are usually considered characteristic of shores." He, therefore, considered these Spanish term as derived from the first meaning of the word in Spanish (see above), but it was very soon discovered that many of his playas do not display marginal beach features.
In the standard interpretation initially proposed by Dodson et al., (1993), people living in an ephemeral lake basin at Cuddie Springs were butchering now-extinct animals and grinding seeds -30,000 BP, before the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM).