epicondyle

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ep·i·con·dyle

 (ĕp′ĭ-kŏn′dĭl, -dl)
n.
A rounded projection at the end of a bone, located on or above a condyle and usually serving as a place of attachment for ligaments and tendons.

epicondyle

(ˌɛpɪˈkɒndɪl)
n
(Anatomy) a bone projection above a condyle
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicondyle - a projection on a bone above a condyle serving for the attachment of muscles and ligaments
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
lateral epicondyle - epicondyle near the lateral condyle of the femur
Translations

ep·i·con·dyle

n. epicóndilo, eminencia sobre el cóndilo de un hueso.

epicondyle

n (of elbow) (lateral) epicóndilo (lateral); (medial) epitróclea, epi-cóndilo medial (esp. Amer)
References in periodicals archive ?
The following measures with ruler and digital pachymeter were performed: (1) forearm length measured from the center of a line between the medial and lateral epicondyles (intercondylar line) to the center of a line between the radial and ulnar styloid processes; (2) distance between the medial epicondyle and the site of PL branch origin; (3) length of the PL motor branch.
* Keep an eye out for enthesitis, a distinctive feature of PsA (common sites including the Achilles tendon insertion, plantar fascia, and lateral epicondyles) (11,12)
Avulsion fracture of the medial and lateral epicondyles of the humerus.
The lateral and anterior--posterior (AP) radiographs of the left elbow revealed widespread, nonsclerotic, and lytic areas with irregular borders, encompassing the epicondyles, ulna and radial head, and lytic foci in the cortex contours.
Reflective markers were placed over the acromion, lateral and medial epicondyles. During data processing, we monitored upper limb movements to identify concentric and eccentric phases of movement.
The midpoint between femoral epicondyles was selected as the knee center KC, and it was used only for shank geometry description.
Compartment pressures and clinical findings were consistent with compartment syndrome and the patient underwent emergent bilateral upper-extremity fasciotomies utilizing a posterior and medial approach to the upper-arm extending from the axilla to the level of the humeral epicondyles. Intraoperative inspection of the biceps and triceps musculature revealed a dusky grayish color beneath the fascia.
Digital percussion of the epicondyles produced pain on the lateral epicondyle.
These markers were attached to the xiphoid process, sternal notch, spinous process of the seventh cervical and eighth thoracic vertebrae, left and right acromioclavicular joints, medial and lateral epicondyles of the elbow, radial and ulnar styloid processes, knuckles II and V, anterior superior iliac spine, posterior superior iliac spine, and a triad of markers on the upper arm.
They may involve the proximal part of humerus (humeral head, greater tubercle), humeral shaft (diaphysis), distal part of humerus (humeral condyle, medial or lateral epicondyles), or combination of these areas.
She had negative Tinel's sign and Phalen's test and no tenderness at the epicondyles.