aponeurosis

(redirected from Epicranial aponeurosis)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

 (ăp′ə-no͝o-rō′sĭs, -nyo͝o-)
n. pl. ap·o·neu·ro·ses (-sēz′)
A sheetlike fibrous membrane, resembling a flattened tendon, that serves as a fascia to bind muscles together or as a means of connecting muscle to bone.

[Greek aponeurōsis, from aponeurousthai, to become tendinous : apo-, apo- + neuron, sinew; see (s)neəu- in Indo-European roots.]

ap′o·neu·rot′ic (-rŏt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

aponeurosis

(ˌæpənjʊəˈrəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
(Anatomy) anatomy a white fibrous sheet of tissue by which certain muscles are attached to bones
[C17: via New Latin from Greek, from aponeurousthai to change into a tendon, from neuron tendon]
aponeurotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ap•o•neu•ro•sis

(ˌæp ə nʊˈroʊ sɪs, -nyʊ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
a flat sheet of connective tissue that connects some muscles to bones.
[1670–80; < Greek aponeúrōsis]
ap`o•neu•rot′ic (-ˈrɒt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.aponeurosis - any of the deeper and thicker fascia that attach muscles to bones; resemble flattened tendons
facia, fascia - a sheet or band of fibrous connective tissue separating or binding together muscles and organs etc
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ap·o·neu·ro·sis

n. aponeurosis, membrana que cubre los músculos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Blood can accumulate between the scalp's epicranial aponeurosis and the periosteum and potentially can extend forward to the orbital margins, backward to the nuchal ridge, and laterally to the temporal fascia.
The anterior part of epicranial aponeurosis and its downward extension into the temple were exposed.
(4) This group can act as muscular insertion points, such as the epicranial aponeurosis, and as joint linkages and tendinous arches ultimately providing proprioceptive information when tension is exerted.