epicureanism

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Related to Epicurean Epistemology: Epicurean philosophy, Epicureans

Ep·i·cu·re·an·ism

 (ĕp′ĭ-kyo͝o-rē′ə-nĭz′əm, -kyo͝or′ē-)
n.
1. A philosophy advanced by Epicurus that considered happiness, or the avoidance of pain and emotional disturbance, to be the highest good and that advocated the pursuit of pleasures that can be enjoyed in moderation.
2. also epicureanism Devotion to a life of pleasure and luxury.

Ep•i•cu•re•an•ism

(ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri əˌnɪz əm, -ˈkyʊər i-)

also Ep•i•cur•ism

(ˈɛp ɪ kyʊˌrɪz əm, ˌɛp ɪˈkyʊər ɪz əm)

n.
1. the philosophical system of Epicurus, holding that the world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms and that the highest good is pleasure, interpreted as freedom from disturbance or pain.
2. (l.c.) epicurean tastes or habits.

epicurism, epicureanism

1. the cultivation of a refined taste, as in food, art, music, etc.; connoisseurship.
2. a devotion or adaptation to luxurious tastes, especially in drinking and eating, or to indulgence in sensual pleasures. — epicure, n.epicurean, n., adj.
See also: Pleasure
the habit of refined, often luxurious, enjoyment of sensuous pleasures, especially of food. — epicurean, n., adj.
See also: Food and Nutrition
the philosophical system of Epicurus, holding that the natural world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms, and that the highest good is f reedom from disturbance and pain. Also Epicurism.Epicurean, n., adj.
See also: Philosophy

Epicureanism

A Greek philosophy identifying good with pleasure but advocating a withdrawn and quiet life.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicureanism - a doctrine of hedonism that was defended by several ancient Greek philosophers
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
Translations
epikureismusepikurejství

epicureanism

[ˌepɪkjʊəˈrɪənɪzəm] Nepicureísmo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Matthews) interpret this passage as a subjectivist response to global skepticism, it is here argued that Augustine's debt to Epicurean epistemology and theology, especially as presented in Ciceros' De Natura Deorum 1.
Epicurean epistemology and ethics are based on the experiences of lonely monads, each of whom determine a private world.