Epigastric region


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Related to Epigastric region: umbilical region, Hypogastric region, epigastric hernia
(Anat.) The whole upper part of the abdomen.
An arbitrary division of the abdomen above the umbilical and between the two hypochondriac regions.

See also: Epigastric, Epigastric

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Abdominal examination showed a midline scar and bulge in the epigastric region that was soft and nontender on palpation.
There was tenderness and defense on palpation of epigastric region. Rebound was not present and bowel sounds were normoactive.
Abdominal examination revealed mild tenderness in epigastric region without peritoneal signs.
The larger one was approximately 3.5x2.0cm, and it was located in the right epigastric region over the last three ribs in a ventral-dorsal projection.
Physical examination revealed tenderness of the epigastric region and the upper right quadrant, with diffuse flushing of the skin.
At clinical examination, a vascular sound could be heard in the epigastric region at auscultation.
Abdominal pain is seen only in 35%patients, whereas gastrointestinal bleeding is present in 94% and pulsatile mass in 25% patients.5 This is a characteristic picture of herald bleeding which is a result of a small fistula tamponaded by thrombus formation.7 Other symptoms may include intermittent back pain, fever, sepsis, melena, weight loss, and syncope.4,7 The patient in the current case presented with lower GI bleeding and a painless pulsating mass in epigastric region. The most valuable tool for diagnosis of PAEF is a contrast-enhanced CT scan abdomen, which has a detection rate of 61%.2,3,5 It has a high sensitivity for PAEF.
However, the abdominal ultrasound showed a voluminous (18 Eu 10 cm) heterogeneous mass located in the epigastric region in front of the pancreas and pushing the left liver lobe anteriorly and laterally.
In 52% (n=104), the pain started in the RIF while in 48% (n=96) patients, the pain started in the umbilical or epigastric region and latter migrated to the RIF.
Congenital abnormality of sternum and diaphragm; protusion of the heart in the epigastric region. Trans Pathol Soc London 69:57-59, 1898.
On examination, there was tenderness in epigastric region and right hypochondrium.