epilogic

epilogic

(ˌɛpɪˈlɒdʒɪk) or

epilogistic

adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) relating to an epilogue
References in periodicals archive ?
Medwall saw an opportunity to please his patron, just as he had seen one in Caxton's epilogic complaint.
"Historical fiction is typically so ample and epilogic that the 'historical short story' may seem a contradiction in terms, but Shepard has made himself, in particular, a master of this small, tricky subgenre." THOMAS MALLON
But at such epilogic moments the audience 'is not being asked to forget what they have just witnessed, but rather to remember it', which they will with lingering pleasure.
Her analysis of the meaning and ineluctable impact of the field of science on homosexuality is, as her epilogic demonstration of the rising tide of anti-homosexual sentiment suggests; both timely and necessary.
"Widening the gear teeth to accommodate greater engine horsepower does not appreciably add to the size of the transmission," noted Epilogic's Pires.
Last month, Pires and Frank Fitz vice president of Epilogic's technical staff, presented a pair of papers to the International Congress and Exposition of the Society of Automotive Engineers in Detroit reporting on the IVT's potential.
Though previous designs have not gained mass acceptance, Suburu has put a continuously variable transmission on the road in its Justy model and Epilogics has developed a prototype hard-geared design that it hopes will prove a viable alternative for high-torque applications.
One of the most recent CVT efforts comes from Epilogics Inc.
Epilogics is hoping that its hard-geared direct-drive transmission will prove to be a viable alternative to friction systems such as the Van Doorne belt, which Pires said can have an upper limit on the amount of torque they can handle.
Season of the Jew follows Te Kooti's return from (illegal) imprisonment on the Chatham Islands, through a series of campaigns against him, and in an epilogic section ambiguously entitled 'Fact and Further', Shadbolt's chronicle takes the reader up to the death of Te Kooti and beyond.
And again he makes use of an 'Author's Note' and an epilogic closing section, this time entitled 'In Fact', which suggests that he has made a deliberate decision to dispense with the experiment of ambiguously blending fact and fiction in his epilogue.
I feel this may account for epilogic apologies: a good playwright invades the body (brain and all), and an apology is due for such grotesque and overt manipulation of the audience.