equatorial coordinate system

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Related to Equatorial Coordinates: Celestial coordinates

equatorial coordinate system

n.
A celestial coordinate system in which an object's position on the celestial sphere is described in terms of its north-south declination and east-west right ascension, measured relative to the celestial equator and vernal equinox, respectively.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Afterwards, a coordinate transformation between Cartesian and equatorial coordinates will be conducted in order to obtain the equatorial coordinate of the point B' (RA,DEC), and then the API based on ASCOM, SlewToCoordinatesAsync (RA,DEC), is used to drive the FASOT's mount to move A' to B'.On the other hand, to implement the function mentioned above, as shown in Figure 3, the scanning software should first implement the following operations: connecting S1 to S2 and S3 to S4.
Finally, the apparent equatorial coordinates are calculated from the following relations:
Two years ago we recognized the importance of this star, named 2MASS J205551.25+435224.6 after its equatorial coordinates in the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) catalog, in a study with the 2.2-meter telescope at the Calar Alto Observatory in Spain.
In case of equatorial coordinates this dependence is expressed as follows:
More or less a contemporary of Ptolemy, he pioneered celestial cartography and probably invented rectangular equatorial coordinates, but his star maps were lost in the 3rd century AD.
Stars extracted from the images must be identified with the star catalogue to obtain their equatorial coordinates [alpha], [delta].
The upper-left corner of the display serves as a status area and constantly shows the equatorial coordinates of the cursor and the angular dimensions of the field.
Other applets calculate Equatorial coordinates and precession, and offer Julian date calendar conversion.
If you set up your camera for the first time or switch to a different camera lens, you'll need to grab and measure a reference image first so you can calculate the meteors' equatorial coordinates. This task takes about 10 minutes with one of MetRec's tools called RefStars.
The data were difficult to work with because they were available neither in machine-readable form nor in equatorial coordinates (a few observatories did include equatorial coordinates in their publications).