equatorial mounting

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equatorial mounting

n
(General Physics) an astronomical telescope mounting that allows motion of the telescope about two mutually perpendicular axes, one of which is parallel to the earth's axis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
An equatorial mount has its axes of rotation tilted at an angle, as in the mount pictured above.
"Collier's Guide to Night Photography in the Great Outdoors" covers such issues as: How to photograph the Milky Way, northern lights, eclipses, meteors, lightning, air glow, lava, and more; What moon phases to shoot under; Light painting the foreground and recommended flashlights; Capturing star trails with both film and digital cameras; Creating comet-like star trails; Stitching huge images that can be printed very large; Stacking images and blending multiple exposures to increase detail; Focus stacking to increase depth of field; Using an equatorial mount (or star tracker); Enlarging star size to bring out constellations.
The normal method of allowing the Sun to transit through the beam of the dish would have taken too long to allow testing of all the devices, so Tony used the driven equatorial mount to scan the dish across the solar disk at 8 times the sidereal tracking rate, allowing a test observation to be completed in about 10 minutes.
True to form, he chose to build a German equatorial mount using basic pipe fittings.
The equipment includes a computer-driven 14-inch Celestron telescope on a German equatorial mount.
The EMMAQUA+ (equatorial mount with mirrors for acceleration with water) can perform the equivalent of a three-year, real-time Florida exposure test in just six months, according to this testing company.
Such was the case with iOptron's CEM120 Center-balanced Equatorial Mount. My gut reaction to this new heavyweight was that it would be good.
When beginners first learn about mounts, they tend to conclude that they need an equatorial mount. Sure, these can be handy, but be aware they tend to be larger, heavier, and more expensive than a mechanically simpler alt-az mount.
He has constructed and refurbished may other pieces of astronomical equipment, including a 6-inch [152mm] f/15 refractor that he used for some years for solar observations, a large equatorial mount that he used for many years, and a Herschel wedge.