Eranthis hyemalis


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Related to Eranthis hyemalis: winter aconite
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Noun1.Eranthis hyemalis - small Old World perennial herb grown for its bright yellow flowers which appear in early spring often before snow is goneEranthis hyemalis - small Old World perennial herb grown for its bright yellow flowers which appear in early spring often before snow is gone
Eranthis, genus Eranthis - winter aconite
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
References in periodicals archive ?
Winter Aconites (Eranthis hyemalis) Aconites grow well in zones three to seven, in full sun or partial shade.
Extraction and purification of the lectin found in the tubers of Eranthis hyemalis (winter aconite).
Eranthis Hyemalis (Winter Aconite) This charming little plant will bring sunny yellow cup-shaped flowers from late winter onwards.
Eranthis Hyemalis, otherwise known as Winter Aconite, is remarkably hardy and offers a welcome burst of winter colour
RANUNCULACEAE (Buttercup Family) ERANTHIS HYEMALIS (L.) Salisb.--CW; MWL [planted and naturalized]; Rare but locally abundant; C = 0; BSUH 19747.
Eranthis Hyemalis 'Guinea Gold', Winter Aconite is just showing its egg-yolk-yellow-like face with a green ruffed collar in my garden and is a joy to see.
OK, this week's offer is a bit of a cheat, but winter aconites, or Eranthis hyemalis, will give you the look of summer wildflowers upon glossy green foliage from January through to March.
Divide and/or plant bulbs-in-the-green such as snowdrops (Galanthus) and winter aconites (Eranthis hyemalis).
ANNE ROWLANDS VIA EMAIL HI ANNE, Yes this is Eranthis hyemalis, the winter aconite.
Set some winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis), snowdrops (Galanthus elwesii) and species crocus like the crocus chrysanthus or crocus tommasinianus close to the house foundation, where escaping heat keeps the soil warm and starts these March bloomers into early growth.
Gardeners can help bees that do start emerging earlier by providing the right flowers such as crocus, grape hyacinth (muscari) and winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis), as well as pulmonaria, Clematis cirrhosa, Erica carnea and spring-flowering mahonias.
Moreover, yellow flowers can color borders, from the winter aconite (Eranthis hyemalis) and cornelian cherry dogwood (Cornus mas,) in early spring to our native witch hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) in the fall.