Eratosthenes

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Related to Erastosthenes: Hipparchus, Sieve of Eratosthenes

E·ra·tos·the·nes

 (ĕr′ə-tŏs′thə-nēz′) Third century bc.
Greek mathematician, astronomer, and geographer who devised a map of the world, estimated the circumference of the earth and the distance to the moon and the sun, and constructed a method for finding prime numbers.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Eratosthenes

(ˌɛrəˈtɒsθɪˌniːz)
n
(Biography) ?276–?194 bc, Greek mathematician and astronomer, who calculated the circumference of the earth by observing the angle of the sun's rays at different places
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Er•a•tos•the•nes

(ˌɛr əˈtɒs θəˌniz)

n.
276?–195? B.C., Greek mathematician and astronomer at Alexandria.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

E·ra·tos·the·nes

(ĕr′ə-tŏs′thə-nēz′)
Third century b.c. Greek mathematician and astronomer. He is best known for making an accurate estimate of the circumference of the Earth by measuring the angle of the sun's rays at two different locations at the same time. Eratosthenes also invented a method for listing the prime numbers that are less than any given number.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Eratosthenes - Greek mathematician and astronomer who estimated the circumference of the earth and the distances to the Moon and sun (276-194 BC)
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References in periodicals archive ?
The library they built there, in the fourth century BC became the world's first university with its scholars including such famous names as Euclid, Erastosthenes, Heron and Archimedes, to name but a few.
By this token the ancient Greek astronomers Aristarchos and Erastosthenes counted for him as experimentalists (ibid.), and the innovation in modern science, to which the word 'experimental' refers, must by implication consist in the inclusion of the use of instruments among the options from which scientists can select the crucial conditions of observation.
Table 3 presents the results obtained from the second and third extensions of Erastosthenes' Sieve, not counting initialization time.