Eratosthenes

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Related to Eratosthenes of Alexandria: Euclid of Alexandria, Ptolemy of Alexandria

E·ra·tos·the·nes

 (ĕr′ə-tŏs′thə-nēz′) Third century bc.
Greek mathematician, astronomer, and geographer who devised a map of the world, estimated the circumference of the earth and the distance to the moon and the sun, and constructed a method for finding prime numbers.

Eratosthenes

(ˌɛrəˈtɒsθɪˌniːz)
n
(Biography) ?276–?194 bc, Greek mathematician and astronomer, who calculated the circumference of the earth by observing the angle of the sun's rays at different places

Er•a•tos•the•nes

(ˌɛr əˈtɒs θəˌniz)

n.
276?–195? B.C., Greek mathematician and astronomer at Alexandria.

E·ra·tos·the·nes

(ĕr′ə-tŏs′thə-nēz′)
Third century b.c. Greek mathematician and astronomer. He is best known for making an accurate estimate of the circumference of the Earth by measuring the angle of the sun's rays at two different locations at the same time. Eratosthenes also invented a method for listing the prime numbers that are less than any given number.
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Noun1.Eratosthenes - Greek mathematician and astronomer who estimated the circumference of the earth and the distances to the Moon and sun (276-194 BC)
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When Eratosthenes of Alexandria stood in the noonday sun at Syene, near the Tropic of Cancer, on the day of the summer solstice in 240 BC and (so the pared-down version of the story goes) observed no shadow, he made one of the world's great scientific conclusions.
After all, Eratosthenes of Alexandria, an ancient Greek mathematician active in the third century B.C.E., not only knew that the world was round but also used trigonometry to measure the size of its circumference to a respectable degree of accuracy.