Erechtheus


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Erechtheus

(ɛˈrɛkθjuːs; -θɪəs)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a king of Athens who sacrificed one of his daughters because the oracle at Delphi said this was the only way to win the war against the Eleusinians
References in classic literature ?
She went to Marathon {59} and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she entered the abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous, and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching the threshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like that of the sun or moon.
5: Hesiod represented Sicyon as the son of Erechtheus.
And they that held the strong city of Athens, the people of great Erechtheus, who was born of the soil itself, but Jove's daughter, Minerva, fostered him, and established him at Athens in her own rich sanctuary.
For some time Connelly had focused on the interpretation of the frieze in the context of two hundred and fifty lines surviving from the lost play by Euripides called Erechtheus. She gives a new meaning to the much discussed scene of the handing of the peplos which she sees as a depiction relating to the sacrifice of one of Erechtheus' daughters to save the city of Athens when threatened by Eumolpus.
Genus etymology.-- Unspecified by Bolivar, presumably per Greek mythology, Erechtheus, a king of Athens, the patronymic of Orithya his daughter (source: Epistles of Ovidius Naso online).
Among the poets, he admired Swinburne's ability to control the "lawless and unchastened character of his genius" through the yoke of classic Greek form (Atalanta in Calydon, Erechtheus) (Hutton, "Mr.
Connelly finds a more plausible explanation in a papyrus fragment from a lost play of Euripides, the Erechtheus.
Had Swinburne produced the most successful, trenchant English drama in the Greek mode; was it importantly flawed; was his Erechtheus perhaps more authentic?
Euripides Selected Fragmentary Plays: Telephus, Cretans, Stheneboea, Bellerophon, Cresphontes, Erechtheus, Phaethon, Wise Melanippe, Captive Melanippe v.
If so, this "memory of signs" which makes the act of construction possible is perhaps nothing less than that "musicality" of which I spoke earlier, an inner music of echo and silence, of "strophe and antistrophe," as Mallarme finds it in Swinburne's Erechtheus. (32)
ACCORDI NG To oNE MYTH, Erechtheus (or Erichthonius) was the mortal