eschatology

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Related to Eschatalogical: eschatological

es·cha·tol·o·gy

 (ĕs′kə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

[Greek eskhatos, last; see eghs in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

es·chat′o·log′i·cal (ĭ-skăt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl, ĕs′kə-tə-lŏj′-) adj.
es·chat′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
es′cha·tol′o·gist n.

eschatology

(ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the branch of theology or biblical exegesis concerned with the end of the world
[C19: from Greek eskhatos last]
eschatological, ˌeschatoˈlogic adj
ˌeschatoˈlogically adv
ˌeschaˈtologist n

es•cha•tol•o•gy

(ˌɛs kəˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. any system of religious doctrines concerning last or final matters, as death, judgment, or an afterlife.
2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
[1835–45; < Greek éschato(s) last + -logy]
es•cha•to•log•i•cal (ˌɛs kə tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ɛˌskæt l-) adj.
es`cha•to•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
es`cha•tol′o•gist, n.

eschatology

Theology. any set of doctrines concerning flnal matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj. — eschatologist, n.
See also: End of the World
any set of doctrines concerning final matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj.eschatologist, n.
See also: Theology

eschatology

The branch of theology that deals with the end of the world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschatology - the branch of theology that is concerned with such final things as death and Last Judgment; Heaven and Hell; the ultimate destiny of humankind
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
Translations
eschatologie
eskatologia
eschatologie

eschatology

[ˌeskəˈtɒlədʒɪ] N (Rel) → escatología f

eschatology

nEschatologie f
References in periodicals archive ?
6) A century after Isaiah, writes Hartman, Jeremiah "can be considered as practically eschatalogical throughout.
Their respective re-enactments of the Theseus myth in dialectic or civic rituals are then correlated with different positions in the topography of the spiritual world as mapped out by Socrates' concluding eschatalogical myth.
Believing that the purity of the church was only an eschatalogical prospect, Augustine insisted on maintaining a distinction between the ideal of a virginal church and the present ecclesial reality.
Muggeridge in reporting on his century created a new literary genre, a kind of eschatalogical journalism as yet unappreciated.
Moreover, the Catholic background of many of the community's members made them more inclined to introduce Christian eschatalogical elements into their Judaism, and thus they may have been particularly sensitive to the matter of immortality.