eschatology

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Related to Eschatalogical: eschatological

es·cha·tol·o·gy

 (ĕs′kə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

[Greek eskhatos, last; see eghs in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

es·chat′o·log′i·cal (ĭ-skăt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl, ĕs′kə-tə-lŏj′-) adj.
es·chat′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
es′cha·tol′o·gist n.

eschatology

(ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the branch of theology or biblical exegesis concerned with the end of the world
[C19: from Greek eskhatos last]
eschatological, ˌeschatoˈlogic adj
ˌeschatoˈlogically adv
ˌeschaˈtologist n

es•cha•tol•o•gy

(ˌɛs kəˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. any system of religious doctrines concerning last or final matters, as death, judgment, or an afterlife.
2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
[1835–45; < Greek éschato(s) last + -logy]
es•cha•to•log•i•cal (ˌɛs kə tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ɛˌskæt l-) adj.
es`cha•to•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
es`cha•tol′o•gist, n.

eschatology

Theology. any set of doctrines concerning flnal matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj. — eschatologist, n.
See also: End of the World
any set of doctrines concerning final matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj.eschatologist, n.
See also: Theology

eschatology

The branch of theology that deals with the end of the world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschatology - the branch of theology that is concerned with such final things as death and Last Judgment; Heaven and Hell; the ultimate destiny of humankind
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
Translations
eschatologie
eskatologia
eschatologie

eschatology

[ˌeskəˈtɒlədʒɪ] N (Rel) → escatología f

eschatology

nEschatologie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Invited by silence to ponder my eschatalogical part,
Placed in the West Clerestory are three twin-panels presenting Luke's list of Jesus' progenitors, a magnificent depiction of the ancient Enoch, who is reported to have "walked with God" and to have been appointed to a heavenly throne as the Son of Man, the Eschatalogical Judge (I Enoch 37-71).
Their respective re-enactments of the Theseus myth in dialectic or civic rituals are then correlated with different positions in the topography of the spiritual world as mapped out by Socrates' concluding eschatalogical myth.
Indeed, submerged perhaps in our theme of the post-Creole imagination, and hinted at through our adoption of the motif of the "Creole Line of Escape," (an idea introduced by Benedicte Boisseron, (2006) who wonderfully explored the Creole complexity of emancipatory processes) from existing states of unhomeliness, is the early Fanon's eschatalogical vision of 'the end of the world.
6) A century after Isaiah, writes Hartman, Jeremiah "can be considered as practically eschatalogical throughout.
Moreover, the Catholic background of many of the community's members made them more inclined to introduce Christian eschatalogical elements into their Judaism, and thus they may have been particularly sensitive to the matter of immortality.
The recent reissuing of Dostoevsky's Spiritual Art: The Burden of Vision (2005) reminds us that his thought is impelled by the urgency of a penetrating eschatalogical vision.
In the course of their journey there they did establish a common purse, based upon a seven-point constitution that established community of goods in an eschatalogical context.
This study suggests, however, that the high eschatalogical tension that marked the pre-crusade period subsided with the conquest of Jerusalem, only to be revived during periods of intense angst.