eschatology

(redirected from Eschatological myths)
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Related to Eschatological myths: Etiological myths

es·cha·tol·o·gy

 (ĕs′kə-tŏl′ə-jē)
n.
1. The branch of theology that is concerned with the end of the world or of humankind.
2. A belief or a doctrine concerning the ultimate or final things, such as death, the destiny of humanity, the Second Coming, or the Last Judgment.

[Greek eskhatos, last; see eghs in Indo-European roots + -logy.]

es·chat′o·log′i·cal (ĭ-skăt′l-ŏj′ĭ-kəl, ĕs′kə-tə-lŏj′-) adj.
es·chat′o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
es′cha·tol′o·gist n.

eschatology

(ˌɛskəˈtɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Theology) the branch of theology or biblical exegesis concerned with the end of the world
[C19: from Greek eskhatos last]
eschatological, ˌeschatoˈlogic adj
ˌeschatoˈlogically adv
ˌeschaˈtologist n

es•cha•tol•o•gy

(ˌɛs kəˈtɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. any system of religious doctrines concerning last or final matters, as death, judgment, or an afterlife.
2. the branch of theology dealing with such matters.
[1835–45; < Greek éschato(s) last + -logy]
es•cha•to•log•i•cal (ˌɛs kə tlˈɒdʒ ɪ kəl, ɛˌskæt l-) adj.
es`cha•to•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
es`cha•tol′o•gist, n.

eschatology

Theology. any set of doctrines concerning flnal matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj. — eschatologist, n.
See also: End of the World
any set of doctrines concerning final matters, as death, the judgment, afterlife, etc. — eschatological, adj.eschatologist, n.
See also: Theology

eschatology

The branch of theology that deals with the end of the world.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eschatology - the branch of theology that is concerned with such final things as death and Last Judgment; Heaven and Hell; the ultimate destiny of humankind
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
Translations
eschatologie
eskatologia
eschatologie

eschatology

[ˌeskəˈtɒlədʒɪ] N (Rel) → escatología f

eschatology

nEschatologie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies identified different typologies of the myth, ranging from natural, social and anthropological myths, to theogonic, cosmogonic and eschatological myths (Milosevic and Stojadinovic 2012, 77).
Baumgartner's opening chapter, prefaced by a useful glossary of terms, argues that eschatological myths are well-nigh universal, with the large exception of Confucian thought, but especially pervasive and urgent in the monotheistic religions of the West.
However, whether at national, sub-national or supra-national level, social groups do often define the meaning of their present situation in the light of foundation myths of their origins as communities (various versions of the American myth of the Founding Fathers, for instance) or cathartic events of destruction and regeneration which indelibly reaffirmed the significance of those origins, on the one hand, and eschatological myths of their future destination (the Nazi myth of the Thousand-Year Reich, for instance), on the other.