Eskimo

(redirected from Eskimos)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Es·ki·mo

 (ĕs′kə-mō′)
n. pl. Eskimo or Es·ki·mos
1. A member of any of a group of peoples inhabiting the Arctic coastal regions of North America and parts of Greenland and northeast Siberia. See Usage Note at Native American.
2. Any of the languages of the Eskimo peoples.

[French Esquimaux, possibly from Spanish esquimao, esquimal, from Montagnais ayashkimew, Micmac.]

Es′ki·mo′an adj.
Usage Note: Eskimo has long been criticized as an offensive term, and many Americans either avoid it or feel uncomfortable using it. In Canada, where Eskimo is especially frowned on, the only acceptable term is Inuit, and Americans have generally come to prefer this name too, knowing it to be a term of ethnic pride. But it is not always understood that Inuit cannot substitute for Eskimo in all cases, being restricted in proper usage to the Inuit-speaking peoples of Arctic Canada and parts of Greenland. In southwest Alaska and Arctic Siberia, where Inuit is not spoken, the comparable term is Yupik, which has not gained as wide a currency in English as Inuit. While use of these more specific terms is generally preferable when speaking of the appropriate linguistic group, none of them can be used of the Eskimoan peoples as a whole; the only inclusive term remains Eskimo. · The claim that Eskimo is offensive is often supported by citing a popular etymology tracing its origin to an Abenaki word meaning "eaters of raw meat." Though modern linguists speculate that the term may actually derive from a Montagnais word referring to the manner of lacing a snowshoe, the matter remains undecided, and meanwhile many English speakers have learned to perceive Eskimo as a derogatory term invented by outsiders in scornful reference to their neighbors' eating habits. See Usage Note at Inuit.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Eskimo

(ˈɛskɪˌməʊ)
npl -mos or -mo
1. (Peoples) a member of a group of peoples inhabiting N Canada, Greenland, Alaska, and E Siberia, having a material culture adapted to an extremely cold climate
2. (Languages) the language of these peoples
3. (Languages) a family of languages that includes Eskimo and Aleut
adj
(Peoples) relating to, denoting, or characteristic of the Eskimos
Former spelling: Esquimau
[C18 from Algonquian Esquimawes]
Usage: Eskimo is considered by many to be offensive, and in North America the term Inuit is usually preferred. Inuit, however, can be accurately applied only to those Aboriginal peoples inhabiting parts of Northern Canada, Alaska, and Greenland (as distinguished from those in Asia or the Aleutian Islands)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Es•ki•mo

(ˈɛs kəˌmoʊ)

n., pl. -mos, (esp. collectively) -mo for 1.
1. a member of a people or group of peoples living on the coast and adjacent hinterland of arctic and subarctic regions from Greenland W through Canada and Alaska to extreme NE Siberia.
2. the group of related languages spoken by the Eskimos. Compare Inuit, Yupik.
[1575–85; earlier Esqimawe(s), appar. < French < Sp esquimao(s) < Montagnais (French sp.) aiachkimeou- a name for the Micmac, extended or transferred to the Labrador Eskimo; perhaps literally, snowshoe-netter]
Es`ki•mo′an, adj.
Es′ki•moid`, adj.
usage: The term Eskimo has largely been supplanted by Inuit in Canada, and Inuit is used officially by the Canadian government. Many Inuit consider Eskimo derogatory, in part because the word was, erroneously, long thought to mean “eater of raw meat.” Nonetheless, Eskimo continues in use in all parts of the world, esp. in historical, archaeological, and cultural contexts. The term Native American is sometimes used to include Eskimo and Aleut peoples. See also Indian.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Eskimo - a member of a people inhabiting the Arctic (northern Canada or Greenland or Alaska or eastern Siberia)Eskimo - a member of a people inhabiting the Arctic (northern Canada or Greenland or Alaska or eastern Siberia); the Algonquians called them Eskimo (`eaters of raw flesh') but they call themselves the Inuit (`the people')
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
2.Eskimo - the language spoken by the Eskimo
Eskimo-Aleut, Eskimo-Aleut language - the family of languages that includes Eskimo and Aleut
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Eskymák
eskimoeskimokieli
ескімосескімосиескімоськаескімоська моваескімоський

Eskimo

[ˈeskɪməʊ]
A. ADJesquimal
B. N (Eskimos (Eskimo (pl)))
1. (= person) → esquimal mf
2. (Ling) → esquimal m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Eskimo

[ˈɛskɪməʊ]
adjesquimau(de), eskimo inv
n
Esquimau(de) m/f
the Eskimos → les Esquimaux
(= language) → esquimau m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Eskimo

(pej)
adjEskimo-, eskimoisch
n
Eskimo m, → Eskimofrau f
(Ling) → Eskimosprache f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Eskimo

[ˈɛskɪˌməʊ] (Eskimos or Eskimo (pl))
1. adjeschimese
2. n (person) → eschimese m/f; (language) → eschimese m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Pontellier to cut out--a marvel of construction, fashioned to enclose a baby's body so effectually that only two small eyes might look out from the garment, like an Eskimo's.
It was given me by an Eskimo in the Sandwich Islands--where there are no sandwiches at all--and as long as I carry it every living thing I meet will love me dearly."
"Why didn't the Eskimo keep it?" she asked, looking at the Magnet with interest.
I couldn't blame him for eating the Eskimo, because it was his nature to do so."
Mackenzie hounds, Eskimo and Labrador dogs, huskies and Malemutes--all tried it on him, and all failed.
[3] Muc-luc: a water-tight, Eskimo boot, made from walrus-hide and trimmed with fur.
The difference between you and the Eskimo who makes a fur-clad blubber-eating god is merely a difference of several thousand years of ascertained facts.
One would have thought nobody but an Eskimo wearing his furs and winter under-clothing could have withstood the iciness of her manner; but the Brute did not freeze.
A couple of teachers furnished turkeys and the type of food brought by the Eskimos did not surprise me.
This guideline is partially based on the landmark 1970s study from Bang and Dyerberg that connected the low incidence of coronary artery disease (CAD) among the Eskimos of Greenland to their diet, rich in whale and seal blubber.
Pink Eskimos a unique and unforgettable brand that you will certainly be seeing more of in the future.