essayist

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es·say·ist

 (ĕs′ā′ĭst)
n.
A writer of essays.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

essayist

(ˈɛseɪɪst)
n
(Professions) a person who writes essays
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

es•say•ist

(ˈɛs eɪ ɪst)

n.
a writer of essays.
[1600–10]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.essayist - a writer of literary worksessayist - a writer of literary works    
author, writer - writes (books or stories or articles or the like) professionally (for pay)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

essayist

[ˈeseɪɪst] N (Literat) → ensayista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

essayist

[ˈɛseɪɪst] n (= writer) → essayiste mfessay question n (on university exam paper)sujet m de dissertation; (on school exam paper)sujet m de rédaction
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

essayist

nEssayist(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

essayist

[ˈɛseɪɪst] nsaggista m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Dobson's own original work are a sufficient guarantee of the taste and discrimination we may look for in a collection like this, in which the random lightnings of the first of the essayists are grouped under certain heads--"Character Sketches," "Tales and Incidents," "Manners and Fashions," and the like--so as to diminish, for the general reader, the scattered effect of short essays on a hundred various subjects, and give a connected, book-like character to the specimens.
Lamb, like Wordsworth, still kept the charm of a serenity, [14] a precision, unsurpassed by the quietest essayist of the preceding age.
I tried other essayists, other critics, whom the machinist had in his library, but it was useless; neither Sidney Smith nor Thomas Carlyle could console me; I sighed for more Macaulay and evermore Macaulay.
Our young men shirked their duty, our philosophers and essayists shirked theirs.
For Addison is among the greatest of our essayists. But although these essays were often meant to teach something, neither Steele nor Addison are always trying to be moral or enforce a lesson.
So our great essayist was laid to rest, but it was not until many years had come and gone that a statue in his honor was placed in the Poets' Corner.
A number of eminent poets and essayists, in the course of the last few centuries, have recorded, in their several ways, their opinion that one can have too much of a good thing.
There is no one in Russian literature now, from schoolboy essayist to learned historian, who does not throw his little stone at Alexander for things he did wrong at this period of his reign.
"I wonder why these young things always choose subjects that would tax the powers of a great essayist!" thought Miss Maxwell, as she tried to sleep.
So all that is said of the wise man by Stoic or Oriental or modern essayist, describes to each reader his own idea, describes his unattained but attainable self.
Here the essayists want to show that gays have a vested interest in the biology of homosexuality--i.e., if it's biological, then it can't be helped and thus shouldn't be therapized or disparaged.
The orthodox condemned the essayists for relying on a form of biblical criticism that inevitably led to loss of faith, for denying the importance of biblical miracles and prophecies, and for depending on their individual consciences to pick and choose among those portions of the Scriptures that they would accept as Divine Revelation and those that they would not.