Essex


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Es·sex

 (ĕs′ĭks)
A historical region and Anglo-Saxon kingdom of southeast England. Probably settled by Saxons in the early sixth century, the kingdom was long dominated by Mercia and later by Wessex before and after its inclusion in the Danelaw territories from 886 to 917.

Essex

(ˈɛsɪks)
n
1. (Placename) a county of SE England, on the North Sea and the Thames estuary; the geographical and ceremonial county includes Thurrock and Southend-on-Sea, which became independent unitary authorities in 1998. Administrative centre: Chelmsford. Pop (excluding unitary authorities): 1 324 100 (2003 est). Area (excluding unitary authorities): 3446 sq km (1310 sq miles)
2. (Historical Terms) an Anglo-Saxon kingdom that in the early 7th century ad comprised the modern county of Essex and much of Hertfordshire and Surrey. By the late 8th century, Essex had become a dependency of the kingdom of Mercia

Essex

(ˈɛsɪks)
n
(Biography) 2nd Earl of, title of Robert Devereux. ?1566–1601, English soldier and favourite of Queen Elizabeth I; executed for treason

Es•sex

(ˈɛs ɪks)

n.
1. 2nd Earl of, Devereux, Robert.
2. a county in SE England. 1,548,800; 1418 sq. mi. (3670 sq. km).
3. a kingdom of the Anglo-Saxon heptarchy in SE England.

Essex

An automobile produced by Hudson Motor Car company of Detroit, Michigan from 1918 to 1932.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Essex - a county in southeastern England on the North Sea and the Thames estuaryEssex - a county in southeastern England on the North Sea and the Thames estuary
England - a division of the United Kingdom
Home Counties - the English counties surrounding London into which Greater London has expanded
References in classic literature ?
Being able to win nothing from the Queen, on his own account Essex gave his friend an estate worth about 1800 pounds.
Didn't the full-rigged ship, the whaler Essex, sink off the west coast of South America, twelve hundred miles from the nearest land for the small boats to cover, and all because of a big cow whale that butted her into kindling-wood?
They follow each other, going very close by the Essex shore.
I make the arrest,'' replied the Knight ``I, Henry Bohun, Earl of Essex, Lord High Constable of England.
There was a short railway official travelling up to the terminus, three fairly short market gardeners picked up two stations afterwards, one very short widow lady going up from a small Essex town, and a very short Roman Catholic priest going up from a small Essex village.
If she had gone to the admiral's, no choice would be left him but to follow the coach, to catch the train by which she traveled, and to outstrip her afterward on the drive from the station in Essex to St.
For after the sailors could no longer come up the Thames, they came on to the Essex coast, to Harwich and Walton and Clacton, and afterwards to Foulness and Shoebury, to bring off the people.
A few days after, in the summer of 1263, Norman of Torn rode at the head of his army of outlaws through the county of Essex, down toward London town.
During the Parliamentary struggle, Reading was besieged by the Earl of Essex, and, a quarter of a century later, the Prince of Orange routed King James's troops there.
For instance, let us suppose that Homer and Virgil, Aristotle and Cicero, Thucydides and Livy, could have met all together, and have clubbed their several talents to have composed a treatise on the art of dancing: I believe it will be readily agreed they could not have equalled the excellent treatise which Mr Essex hath given us on that subject, entitled, The Rudiments of Genteel Education.
I have seen Owen Chace, who was chief mate of the Essex at the time of the tragedy; I have read his plain and faithful narrative; I have conversed with his son; and all this within a few miles of the scene of the catastrophe.
Then there was Colonel Cecil Burleigh Essex, another F.