Esterházy

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Es·ter·há·zy

 (ĕs′tĕr-hä′zē)
Hungarian princely family in existence since the 1600s. Its members held a number of military, political, and religious positions and were influential patrons of the arts, particularly regarding the career of Franz Joseph Haydn.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Esterházy

(ˈɛstəˌhɑːzɪ)
n
(Biography) a noble Hungarian family that produced many soldiers, diplomats, and patrons of the arts. Prince Miklós József Esterházy (1714–90) rebuilt the family castle of Esterháza and employed Haydn as his musical director (1766–90)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore the father figures, of which there are several dozens in the novel, can be a Prince Miklos Esterhazy, or Pal (who was also the author of Mars Hungaricus), but just as well Esterhazy's real father, or any clerk, clergyman, butcher, or peasant, perpetrator or victim, in Hungary's history.
Now budget-label Naxos brings us the opportunity to sample his work with the first release in what promises to be an ongoing series from the crisp and stylish Nicolaus Esterhazy Sinfonia under German conductor Uwe Grodd.
Earlier publications in the series include an excellent monograph on the novelist Peter Nedas by Peter Balassa and critical assessments of the work of Ottlik, Esterhazy, Grendel, and others.
The names which lie in the order book today are almost like a page from the Almanach de Gotha with the Esterhazy among them, of course.
Peter Esterhazy is one of the leading writers of Hungarian fiction.
Here Esterhazy pays tribute to The Hite Report on female sexuality: he used it as a guide for his "questionnaires" in this chapter.
In this "manifesto" and initial explication of the notion of the post-Magyar, especially in the suggestion of the idea of something "above and beyond the Magyar," Odorics takes up what both Kukorelly and another prominent Hungarian author, Peter Esterhazy, proclaim as an important approach to Hungarianness in its contemporary context of resurrected nationalism.