Esterházy

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Es·ter·há·zy

 (ĕs′tĕr-hä′zē)
Hungarian princely family in existence since the 1600s. Its members held a number of military, political, and religious positions and were influential patrons of the arts, particularly regarding the career of Franz Joseph Haydn.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Esterházy

(ˈɛstəˌhɑːzɪ)
n
(Biography) a noble Hungarian family that produced many soldiers, diplomats, and patrons of the arts. Prince Miklós József Esterházy (1714–90) rebuilt the family castle of Esterháza and employed Haydn as his musical director (1766–90)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
A lifelong resident of Austria, Haydn spent much of his career as a court musician for the wealthy Esterhazy family on their remote estate.
The ennoblement of the large rich Esterhazy family was, however, due less to their zealous encouragement of the arts, and their promotion of the music of Joseph Haydn and Johann Nepomuk Hummel, than to their victories over the Turks and their loyalty to the House of Habsburg.
The composer had been born in modern Austria, but many relevant sites and archives were over the borders, particularly the seat of the Esterhazy family where Haydn spent many years as Kapellmeister.
After leaving the von Reutter household, Haydn spent a large portion of his adult life working as a court musician for the Hungarian Esterhazy family. During his thirty years with the Esterhazy family, Haydn produced many works including the Paris Symphonies and the orchestral version of The Seven Last Words of Christ.
Although the Esterhazy family was Hungarian by origin, theirs was a world without national identity in which Italian, French or even Latin was as much used as German.
For instance, Green argues that the Esterhazy family was essentially German in culture and language, but Head argues that Haydn would not have seen himself as a representative of German music or culture in part because of that family's status as Hungarian nobility.