diethyl ether

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di·eth·yl ether

 (dī-ĕth′əl)
n.
See ether.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

diethyl ether

(daɪˈɛθɪl)
n
1. (Elements & Compounds) a formal name for ether1
2. (Medicine) a formal name for ether1
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•ther

(ˈi θər)

n.
1.
a. Also called ethyl ether. a colorless, highly volatile, flammable liquid, C4H10O, having an aromatic odor and sweet burning taste, used as a solvent and formerly as an inhalant anesthetic.
b. (formerly) one of a class of compounds in which two organic groups are attached directly to an oxygen atom, having the general formula ROR.
2. upper regions of space; the clear sky; the heavens.
3. the medium supposed by the ancients to fill the upper regions of space.
4. a substance formerly supposed to occupy all space, accounting for the propagation of electromagnetic radiation through space.
[1350–1400; < Latin aethēr the upper air, ether < Greek aithḗr, akin to aíthein to glow, burn]
e•ther•ic (ɪˈθɛr ɪk, ɪˈθɪər-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.diethyl ether - a colorless volatile highly inflammable liquid formerly used as an inhalation anesthetic
enflurane, Ethrane - a nonflammable liquid (trade name Ethrane) used as an inhalation general anesthetic
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Diethylether
etere dietilico
References in periodicals archive ?
aureus ALA1 lipase was enhanced by diethyl ether (Et2O), whereas nearly 100% of its catalytic activity was retained in 25% (v/v) organic solvents such as ACE, benzene, MeOH, MeCN, PROH, ETOH, or toluene (TOL) [24, 51].
Entry Catalyst Solvent Time Yield (h) (%) (b) (1) MCM-41 THF 3 31 (2) PMoA THF 3 39 (3) PWA THF 3 46 (4) 40 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 53 (5) 50 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 60 (6) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 86 (7) 70 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 70 (8) 80 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 68 (9) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 EtOH 3 73 (10) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 Et2O 3 54 (11) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 AcOEt 3 35 (12) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 acetone 3 47 (13) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 toluene 3 47 (14) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 ch3cn 3 34 (15) 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 CH2Cl2 3 24 (16)c 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 83 (17)d 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 43 (18)e 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 3 99 (19)e 60 wt% PWA/MCM-41 THF 2.5 99 (a) Reaction conditions (unless noted otherwise): 0.20 mmol of indole, 0.10 mmol of isatin, 0.0050 g of catalyst in 0.2 mL of solvent at room temperature for 3 h.
After cooling, the flavonoid aglycons are extracted with diethyl ether (Et2O) from the aqueous phase.
For further optimization of the reaction condition, we repeated the reaction of the formation of 4j in different solvents such as EtOH, MeOH, MeCN, Et2O, THF, CH2Cl2, CHCl3.