ethnology

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Related to Ethnologists: ethnologic, ethnology

eth·nol·o·gy

 (ĕth-nŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of anthropology that analyzes and compares human cultures, as in social structure, language, religion, and technology; cultural anthropology.

eth′no·log′ic (ĕth′nə-lŏj′ĭk), eth′no·log′i·cal adj.
eth′no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
eth·nol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ethnology

(ɛθˈnɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the branch of anthropology that deals with races and peoples, their relations to one another, their origins, and their distinctive characteristics
ethnologic, ˌethnoˈlogical adj
ˌethnoˈlogically adv
ethˈnologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

eth•nol•o•gy

(ɛθˈnɒl ə dʒi)

n.
1. a branch of anthropology that analyzes cultures, esp. in regard to their development and the similarities and dissimilarities between them.
3. (formerly)
b. a branch of anthropology dealing with racial origins, distribution, and characteristics.
[1835–45]
eth`no•log′i•cal (-nəˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) eth`no•log′ic, adj.
eth•nol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnology

the study, often comparative, of the origins and development of the races of mankind. — ethnologist, n. — ethnologic, ethnological, adj.
See also: Anthropology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ethnology

1. The study of the origins and characteristics of peoples and races.
2. A branch of anthropology which focuses on classifying people and cultures and explaining how these groups became distributed.
3. The scientific study of human cultures or peoples, especially with regard to their origins, distribution, or characteristics.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethnology - the branch of anthropology that deals with the division of humankind into races and with their origins and distribution and distinctive characteristicsethnology - the branch of anthropology that deals with the division of humankind into races and with their origins and distribution and distinctive characteristics
anthropology - the social science that studies the origins and social relationships of human beings
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
إثْنولوجْيا، عِلم الأعْراق البَشَرِيَّه
etnologie
etnologi
etnologia
etnológia
òjóîfræîi, òjóîháttafræîi
etnologia
etnológia
budun bilimetnoloji

ethnology

[eθˈnɒlədʒɪ] Netnología f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ethnology

[ɛθˈnɒlədʒi] nethnologie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ethnology

n(vergleichende) Völkerkunde, Ethnologie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ethnology

[ɛθˈnɒlədʒɪ] netnologia
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ethnic

(ˈeθnik) adjective
of nations or races of mankind or their customs, dress, food etc. ethnic groups/dances.
ethnology (eθˈnolədʒi) noun
the study of the different races of mankind.
ˌethnoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
ethˈnologist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The science that treats of the various tribes of Man, as robbers, thieves, swindlers, dunces, lunatics, idiots and ethnologists.
You see, as an ethnologist, the thing's very interesting to me.
"My brother is a great ethnologist," said Valentin.
People were remembering Tsai Gu, not only for her numerous kind acts, but also for the legend surrounding her resurrection, which has been widely covered by media agencies and studied by ethnologists. Her story was even adapted into a few Taiwanese movies and TV dramas.
Hieb presents the story of "Jere Sullivan, M.D." and also includes biographies of his contemporaries: the Hopi men, Wiki and Polacca; the students of Pueblo architecture, Cosmos and Victor Mindeleff; the ethnologists, F.
Through Ferdinand Blumentritt, Rizal met the most eminent European ethnologists of those days.
The preface discusses the emerging importance of images of animals in art history and the value of these images to historians, sociologists, ethnologists, and even philosophers.
To preserve what it could, the Smithsonian Institution sent ethnologists and anthropologists to record tribal languages and songs; as the Smithsonian's first ethnomusicologist, Densmore worked nearly sixty years to produce thousands of wax cylinder recordings of songs and stories from about thirty-five Indian tribes.
Ito's book examines this complex process of contestation and the interaction between minority communities, ethnologists, and policymakers at various levels.
Though they may not have explicitly referred to themselves as European ethnologists, they were doing what we do: investigating the activities of everyday life in European societies and urban settings and at the same time interrogating the boundaries drawn between them and what is labeled non-Western and/or premodern.
King's insight into how these three very different ethnologists met the challenge of fieldwork so many years ago and her ability to get into their heads and hearts is amazing, transporting and unusually affecting.