ethylene

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Related to Ethylene dibromide: Ethylene dichloride

eth·yl·ene

 (ĕth′ə-lēn′)
n.
A colorless flammable gas, C2H4, derived from natural gas and petroleum and also occurring as a natural plant hormone, used as a source of many organic compounds, in welding and cutting metals, to ripen citrus fruits, and as an anesthetic. Also called ethene.

eth′yl·e′nic (-ə-lē′nĭk, -lĕn′ĭk) adj.

ethylene

(ˈɛθɪˌliːn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless flammable gaseous alkene with a sweet odour, obtained from petroleum and natural gas and used in the manufacture of polythene and many other chemicals. Formula: CH2:CH2. Also called: ethene
ethylenic adj

eth•yl•ene

(ˈɛθ əˌlin)
n.
a colorless, flammable gas, C2H4, used as an agent in the synthesis of organic compounds, in enhancing the color of citrus fruits, and in medicine chiefly as an inhalation anesthetic.
[1850–55]
eth`yl•e′nic (-ˈli nɪk, -ˈlɛn ɪk) adj.

eth·yl·ene

(ĕth′ə-lēn′)
A colorless, flammable gas, C2H4, obtained from petroleum and natural gas. It is used as a fuel, in making plastics, and in ripening and coloring fruits. Also called ethene.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ethylene - a flammable colorless gaseous alkene; obtained from petroleum and natural gas and used in manufacturing many other chemicals; sometimes used as an anesthetic
alkene, olefin, olefine - any unsaturated aliphatic hydrocarbon
TCE, trichloroethane, trichloroethylene - a heavy colorless highly toxic liquid used as a solvent to clean electronic components and for dry cleaning and as a fumigant; causes cancer and liver and lung damage
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
Translations
etenetylen

ethylene

[ˈeθɪliːn] Netileno m

ethylene

nÄthylen nt

ethylene

[ˈɛθɪliːn] netilene m

eth·yl·ene

n. etileno, anestésico.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ethylene dibromide (EDB), dibromochloropropane (DBCP) and trichloropropane (TCP) are halogenated compounds that may leach into ground or surface water.
Positive relationships between depression and cumulative days of use were evident, though nonmonotonic, in each case group for the fumigants ethylene dibromide and methyl bromide, the fungicide captan, and the organochlorine insecticide lindane.
CONCLUSION: Ethylene dibromide is highly toxic substance; up to one ampoule may be lethal if not treated immediately.
Further complicating the problems is that tetraethyl lead and ethylene dibromide scavenger chemicals in fuel do not necessarily atomize in the proper proportions from cylinder to cylinder, especially with carbureted engines.
Another toxic compound of lead, lead-bromide gas, is produced by combustion of fuels containing ethylene dibromide.
Most liquid-formulated fumigants such as ethylene dibromide which were used to kill insects in stored products, have been banned because of a possible risk of carcinogenicity in mammals.