Euboea


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Eu·boe·a

 (yo͞o-bē′ə) also Ev·voia (ĕv′yä)
An island of central Greece in the Aegean Sea east of the mainland. It was settled by Ionian and Thracian colonists and was later controlled by Athens, Rome, Byzantium, Venice, and Turkey before becoming part of Greece in 1830.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Euboea

(juːˈbɪə)
n
(Placename) an island in the W Aegean Sea: the largest island after Crete of the Greek archipelago; linked with the mainland by a bridge across the Euripus channel. Capital: Chalcis. Pop: 198 130 (2001). Area: 3908 sq km (1509 sq miles). Modern Greek name: Évvoia Former English name: Negropont
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Eu•boe•a

(yuˈbi ə)

n.
a Greek island in the W Aegean Sea. 188,410; 1586 sq. mi. (4110 sq. km). Cap.: Chalcis. Modern Greek, Evvoia.
Eu•boe′an, adj., n.
Eu•bo′ic (-ˈboʊ ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
Euböa
Eubée
EubeaEviaNegroponte
References in classic literature ?
The only other personal reference is to his victory in a poetical contest at the funeral games of Amphidamas at Chalcis in Euboea, where he won the prize, a tripod, which he dedicated to the Muses of Helicon ("Works and Days", 651-9).
1-2) is to be connected with notices of the allies of the Lapithae from Phthiotis and Iolchus, and that the story of Io was incidental to a narrative of Heracles' expedition against Euboea. The remaining poem, the "Melampodia", was a work in three books, whose plan it is impossible to recover.
With him there came forty ships of the Locrians who dwell beyond Euboea.
The fierce Abantes held Euboea with its cities, Chalcis, Eretria, Histiaea rich in vines, Cerinthus upon the sea, and the rock-perched town of Dium; with them were also the men of Carystus and Styra; Elephenor of the race of Mars was in command of these; he was son of Chalcodon, and chief over all the Abantes.
So we asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that we should be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the open sea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang up which gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, {29} where we offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far on our way.
Aigina's Apollo temple also points at Delos, and so does that of Eretria on the island of Euboea.
To make matters worse, Athenian forces then lost a battle in Euboea.
The fortification of Decelea in Attica did separate Athens from a large part of its countryside and cut off the land route to the critically important island of Euboea, and this fortification did define to a strong degree Athenian and Spartan strategy for the final years of the war.
The (http://www.culture.gr/el/information/SitePages/view.aspx?nID=2034) Greek Ministry of Culture reported that a team has found the remains of the sanctuary near Amarynthos, a coastal town a couple of dozen miles northeast of Athens on the large Greek island of Euboea. Scientists and historians have spent more than a century looking for what is left of the temple, but an ancient text with inaccurate directions threw them off the trail.