Eucken


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Eucken

(German ˈɔykən)
n
(Biography) Rudolph Christoph (ˈruːdɔlf ˈkrɪstɔf). 1846–1926, German idealist philosopher: Nobel prize for literature 1908
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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In trying to establish a line of continuity between the "Geneva School" and today's global bureaucrats, Slobodian places great stress on the "Ordo liberals." This group, which included Franz Bohm and Walter Eucken, favored a very active government to promote the social institutions for a "social market economy.
(19) Walter Eucken, The Foundations of Economics (Terence Wilmot Hutchinson, 1950) 152-56, 269-70; David Gerber, 'Constitutionalizing the Economy: German Neo-Liberalism, Competition Law and the "New" Europe' (1994) 42 American Journal of Comparative Law 25, 43, 49-50.
(4) Respectively, Theodor Mommsen (1902) and Winston Churchill (1953) won for history, Rudolf Christoph Eucken (1908) and Henri Bergson (1927) for philosophy, Svetlana Alexievich (2015) for journalism, and Dario Fo (1997) for dramatic monologue.
In Wilhelm Ropke's, Walter Eucken's and Ludwig Erhard's view, but also according to other representatives of SME, the subsidiarity principle applies to all levels of the public sphere.
And here's the even greater truth: to bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon, and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, 'a moment in the life' of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
And here's the even greater truth: To bestow it on one of our last popular poets, the distant relative of Rutebeuf, Villon and all the minstrels and songsters of solitude and dereliction; to consecrate a troubadour, a bard of the brotherhood of lonely and lost souls; to crown the author of ballads that have been, to borrow Andre Suares' phrase about Rimbaud, "a moment in the life" of so many people in the 20th and 21st centuries makes a lot more sense than pulling out of a hat the obscure Rudolf Christoph Eucken or picking poor old Sully Prudhomme instead of Tolstoy.
(41.) See FRANZ BOHM, WALTER EUCKEN & HANS GROSSMAN-DOERTH, THE ORDO MANIFESTO OF 1936 (1936), reprinted in THE MAKING OF COMPETITION POLICY: LEGAL AND ECONOMIC SOURCES 254,265 (Daniel A.
Feld: Professor of Economic Policy and Constitutional Economics, and Director, Walter Eucken Institut, University of Freiburg, Freiburg, Germany.