eugenics

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Related to Eugenics movement: Margaret Sanger

eu·gen·ics

 (yo͞o-jĕn′ĭks)
n. (used with a sing. verb)
The study or practice of attempting to improve the human gene pool by encouraging the reproduction of people considered to have desirable traits and discouraging or preventing the reproduction of people considered to have undesirable traits.

eu·gen′ic adj.
eu·gen′i·cal·ly adv.

eugenics

(juːˈdʒɛnɪks)
n
(Genetics) (functioning as singular) the study of methods of improving the quality of the human race, esp by selective breeding
[C19: from Greek eugenēs well-born, from eu- + -genēs born; see -gen]
euˈgenic, euˈgenical adj
euˈgenically adv
euˈgenicist, euˈgenecist n
eugenist n, adj

eu•gen•ics

(yuˈdʒɛn ɪks)

n. (used with a sing. v.)
a science concerned with improving a species, esp. the human species, by such means as influencing or encouraging reproduction by persons presumed to have desirable genetic traits.
[1880–85]
eu•gen′i•cist (-ə sɪst) n.

eugenics

the science of improving a breed or species through the careful selection of parents. — eugenicist, n. — eugenic, adj.
See also: Improvement
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.eugenics - the study of methods of improving genetic qualities by selective breeding (especially as applied to human mating)
bioscience, life science - any of the branches of natural science dealing with the structure and behavior of living organisms
cacogenics, dysgenics - the study of the operation of factors causing degeneration in the type of offspring produced
Translations

eugenics

[juːˈdʒenɪks] NSINGeugenesia f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] neugénisme m

eugenics

n singEugenik f

eugenics

[juːˈdʒɛnɪks] nsgeugenica

eu·gen·ics

n. eugenesia, ciencia que estudia el mejoramiento de la especie humana de acuerdo con las leyes biológicas de la herencia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Social scientists in the thrall of the eugenics movement enthusiastically endorsed policies that excluded "unfit workers" from the labor market lest those workers' earnings enable them to continue polluting the gene pool.
Early in my career, I taught a course that covered the eugenics movement, which advocated the selective breeding of humans.
Indeed, the American eugenics movement cannot be understood apart from its advancement under socially impeccable auspices.
The twenty-first century finds the American eugenics movement alive and well.
Imbeciles explores one notorious historical example of such high-intentioned abuse pushed forward by the intellectual, social, and political elites of the day, namely the eugenics movement of the late 19th and early 20th centuries that sought to perfect the American populace by getting rid of its genetically "defective" members.
Winters also addresses the discriminatory eugenics movement targeted at gay men and women in Oregon during the time.
Professor Hartman relates these myths to the rise of the early-twentieth-century eugenics movement, which sought to regenerate and purify a once proud but now impoverished and degraded people through policies that included forced sterilization to weed out "imbeciles.
Far from being a distortion or betrayal of philanthropic logic," Beer writes, "the eugenics movement .
The international eugenics movement informed thinking on women's sexuality and reproduction and the editors include documents by women who endorsed birth control to protect the race rather than to promote women's rights.
24) The eugenics movement of the early twentieth century had two goals: (1) to keep degenerate immigrants out of the country and (2) to sterilize as many degenerates as possible.
Vliet maintains there is an even darker side to Planned Parenthood--the connection to the American Eugenics movement of the early 1900s.
Turda and Gillette present students, academics, and researchers with a comparative examination of eugenics as a scientific program and the common ground between the Latin eugenics movement in Europe and in North and South America.