ocean

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Related to Euphotic zone: photic, upwelling

o·cean

 (ō′shən)
n.
1. The entire body of salt water that covers more than 70 percent of the earth's surface.
2. Abbr. Oc. or O. Any of the principal divisions of the ocean, including the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Southern Oceans.
3. A great expanse or amount: "that ocean of land which is Russia" (Henry A. Kissinger).

[Middle English occean, from Old French, from Latin ōceanus, from Greek Ōkeanos, the god Oceanus, a great river encircling the earth.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ocean

(ˈəʊʃən)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a very large stretch of sea, esp one of the five oceans of the world, the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic
2. (Physical Geography) the body of salt water covering approximately 70 per cent of the earth's surface
3. a huge quantity or expanse: an ocean of replies.
4. literary the sea
[C13: via Old French from Latin ōceanus, from Greek ōkeanos Oceanus]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

o•cean

(ˈoʊ ʃən)

n.
1. the vast body of salt water that covers almost three-fourths of the earth's surface.
2. any of the geographical divisions of this body, commonly given as the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic oceans.
3. a vast expanse or quantity: an ocean of grass.
[1250–1300; Middle English (< Old French) < Latin < Greek Ōkeanós Oceanus]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

o·cean

(ō′shən)
1. The continuous saltwater body that covers about 72 percent of the surface of the Earth.
2. Any of the principal divisions of this body of water, including the Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Arctic Oceans.
Usage The word ocean refers to one of the Earth's four distinct, large areas of salt water, the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic Oceans. The word can also mean the entire network of water that covers almost three quarters of our planet. It comes from the Greek Okeanos, a river believed to circle the globe. The word sea can also mean the vast ocean covering most of the world. But it more commonly refers to large landlocked or almost landlocked salty waters smaller than the great oceans, such as the Mediterranean Sea or the Bering Sea. Sailors have long referred to all the world's waters as the seven seas. Although the origin of this phrase is not known for certain, many people believe it referred to the Red Sea, the Mediterranean Sea, the Persian Gulf, the Black Sea, the Adriatic Sea, the Caspian Sea, and the Indian Ocean, which were the only waters of interest to Europeans before Columbus.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Ocean/Oceanfronts

 

See Also: SEASCAPES

  1. The Alvin [a ship] … moved through the dark sea like a robot fish —Richard Moran
  2. The beach is bare as the blue bowl of the sky —John Hall Wheelock

    See Also: BARENESS

  3. The beach was splattered with people like bright rags —Nadine Gordimer
  4. (Here in front of the summer hotel) the beach waits like an altar —Anne Sexton
  5. A beach, white and slender like a young moon —Louis Bromfield
  6. A breaker … roaring over the reef like a herd of crazed animals running before a forest fire —Clive Cussler
  7. The gentle surf crested in the quick darkness with swirling phosphorous fringes of tiny animals like liquid silver —James Crumley
  8. Long blue rollers coming in … each a neat and level line like an ironed crease —George Garrett
  9. The ocean frowns like elephant hide —Karl Shapiro
  10. The ocean like sleek gray stone —Robinson Jeffers
  11. The ocean looked like a wide lavender ribbon stitched up against a pink-and-blue sky —Sue Grafton
  12. The ocean rumbled like a train backing up —Anne Sexton
  13. The ocean seemed to hover in the distance like a gray haze blending into the gray of the sky —Sue Grafton
  14. The rough white crests of waves walk as if in moccasins —Diane Wakoski
  15. The sea growled like a dog —John Mortimer
  16. The sea has that oily sheen to it, like an empty swimming pool —William Boyd
  17. The sea is like a human being … always moving, always something deep in itself stirring it … always wanting —Olive Shreiner
  18. The sea [along the beach jetties] trembling among the stones like gelatin —Thomas McGuane
  19. The sea whispered and hummed like a great shell held to the ear —Mary Stewart
  20. The surf hisses like tambourines —Derek Walcott
  21. The tide came in like ten thousand orgasms —Anne Sexton

    See Also: NOISE

  22. The water ran over the sand, one wave covering another like the knitting of threads —Rachel Ingalls
  23. Waves … black as cypresses, clear as the water of a wishing well —Denise Levertov

    See Also: BLACK, CLARITY

  24. Waves crashing with the sound as of breaking biscuits —Vita Sackville-West
  25. Waves … leaping like hounds up at the rocks —Josephine Jacobsen
  26. Waves like small mountains rose with the shrieking wind into the black sky —James Stern
  27. A wave like a vast castle —Arabian Nights
  28. Waves, like blue animals stampeding —George Garrett
  29. Waves like white feathers —George Garrett
  30. The waves pulse … like hearts —Sylvia Plath
  31. A wave suddenly raged out like a mountain cat —Stephen Crane
  32. Waves that rose like mountains —D. R. MacDonald
  33. The waves were skidding in like big buildings that swayed drunkenly and then toppled over on their faces and splattered all over the hard sand —Arthur Miller

    Miller, best known for his plays, has also written short stories … one of which, I Don’t Need You Any More, is the source for this comparison.

  34. When the surf is up its roaring fills you like a shell —Marge Piercy
  35. The whole expanse of water … glistened like a sheet of stretched blue silk —Robie Macauley
Similes Dictionary, 1st Edition. © 1988 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

ocean

The great sheet of salt water surrounding the Earth’s landmasses; also its subdivision into the Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, and Arctic oceans.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ocean - a large body of water constituting a principal part of the hydrosphereocean - a large body of water constituting a principal part of the hydrosphere
body of water, water - the part of the earth's surface covered with water (such as a river or lake or ocean); "they invaded our territorial waters"; "they were sitting by the water's edge"
deep - literary term for an ocean; "denizens of the deep"
hydrosphere - the watery layer of the earth's surface; includes water vapor
shore - the land along the edge of a body of water
2.ocean - anything apparently limitless in quantity or volume
large indefinite amount, large indefinite quantity - an indefinite quantity that is above the average in size or magnitude
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ocean

noun
1. sea, the deep, the waves, main, the drink (informal), the briny (informal) the beautiful sight of the calm ocean on a warm night
2. a lot, a great deal, a mass (informal), a load (informal), a multitude, a heap, a stack, an abundance, a large amount, a plethora, a quantity, a profusion, a number, a vast number He has oceans of loyal fans. see seas and oceans
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
أحَد المُحيطات الخَمْسَهمُحيطمُحِيطٌ
океан
oceán
ocean=-havethav
oceano
اقیانوس
valtameri
ocean
óceán
hafhaf, úthaf
海洋
대양
oceanus
okeanasvandenynas
okeāns
oceán
ocean
havocean
มหาสมุทร
okyanusOkyanusu
океан
đại dương

ocean

[ˈəʊʃən]
A. Nocéano m
oceans of (fig) → la mar de
B. CPD [climate, region] → oceánico
ocean bed Nfondo m del océano
ocean cruise Ncrucero m
ocean liner Ntransatlántico m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ocean

[ˈəʊʃən] n
(= sea) → océan m
the seas and oceans of the world → les mers et océans du monde
I went down to the ocean and took a swim → Je suis allé jusqu'à l'océan et j'ai nagé.
it's a drop in the ocean (= insignificant amount) → c'est une goutte d'eau dans l'océan
(fig)
The blues span an ocean of styles → Le blues recouvre une multitude de styles.
oceans of (= lots of) → des tonnes de
an ocean of tears → un océan de larmesocean bed nfonds mpl océaniquesocean-going [ˈəʊʃəngəʊɪŋ] adj [boat, vessel] → de haute mer
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ocean

n
Ozean m, → Meer nt
an ocean of flowersein Blumenmeer nt; oceans of (inf)jede Menge (inf), → massenhaft

ocean

:
ocean bed
nMeeresboden mor -grund m
ocean chart
nSeekarte f
ocean climate
nMeeresklima nt, → maritimes Klima
ocean-going
adjhochseetauglich; ocean tugHochseeschlepper m

ocean

:
Ocean State
n the ocean (US) → Rhode Island nt
ocean voyage
nSchiffsreise f, → Seereise f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ocean

[ˈəʊʃn] noceano
oceans of (fam) → fiumi mpl di
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

ocean

(ˈəuʃən) noun
1. the salt water that covers most of the earth's surface.
2. one of its five main divisions. the Atlantic Ocean.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

ocean

مُحِيطٌ oceán ocean Ozean ωκεανός océano valtameri océan ocean oceano 海洋 대양 oceaan hav ocean oceano океан hav มหาสมุทร okyanus đại dương 海洋
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, it was used the Lalli & Parsons' criterion (2006) who define z as the limit of the euphotic zone.
Water transparency was measured using a Secchi disk, and the euphotic zone ([Z.sub.eup]) was calculated as 3.0 times the Secchi disk depth (Cole, 1994).
We tested the hypothesis that the diaspore bank would be the responsible factor for the maintenance of the aquatic plant species, and their success could be related to the depth of the euphotic zone.
During refilling in 2011, the water in the lake zone was aerated and destratified using twenty aeration towers that pumped an air/water mixture into the hypoxic water layer on the lake bottom and/or repumped oxygenated water from the euphotic zone into the deeper hypolimnion (Palcik et al.
Sediments of these facies were deposited below normal wave base but within the shallow euphotic zone, as indicated by the presence of cyclocrinitid green algae (Beadle & Johnson 1986).
Productivity varies with the availability of light and takes place within the euphotic zone. This extends from the surface to a depth where there is 1% of the light intensity from the surface.
Mean, minimum, and maximum values of the diffuse attenuation coefficient ([K.sub.d,PAR], [m.sup.-1]), average light availability in the mixed layer ([E.sub.mix], mol[m.sup.-2][day.sup.-1]), and the depth of the euphotic zone ([z.sub.1%], m) in offshore (LP2, LP4, LP11) and inshore (LP16, LP17, LP38) sampling points of Peipsi in 1983-2007 and in Vortsjarv in 1964-2007.
The water samples were collected from selected depths (0.00, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0 m) distributed within the euphotic zone. The samples collected from different depths were mixed in equal proportions to produce composite samples and were used for chemical analyses and measurement of biomass as chlorophyll a concentration.
Suess (1980) postulated an empirical equation that predicts [C.sub.org] flux at any depth in the ocean below the euphotic zone as a function of the primary production rate in surface waters and depth dependent consumption.
Basic limnological information was first established for Pingualuk Lake in 1988, when a Secchi depth of ~37 m and a euphotic zone (delimited by 1% of surface irradiance level) down to a depth of 89 m were recorded (Bouchard, 1989; Ouellet et al., 1989).