European wildcat


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Noun1.European wildcat - bushy-tailed wildcat of Europe that resembles the domestic cat and is regarded as the ancestor of the domestic catEuropean wildcat - bushy-tailed wildcat of Europe that resembles the domestic cat and is regarded as the ancestor of the domestic cat
Felis, genus Felis - type genus of the Felidae: true cats and most wildcats
wildcat - any small or medium-sized cat resembling the domestic cat and living in the wild
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
"By looking at its DNA, we could tell it apart from the European wildcat, Felis silvestris silvestris .
The European wildcat, almost the size of our bobcat, is widespread but scarce and often protected.
The European wildcat Felis silvestris is a medium-sized, elusive carnivore widely but patchily distributed throughout the Palaearctic (Yamaguchi et al.
Populations of the European wildcat Felis silvestris silvestris Schreber 1777, once widely distributed across Europe, decreased dramatically in central Europe owing to persecution and habitat loss over the past two centuries (Piechocki 1990, Nowell and Jackson 1996, Driscoll and Nowell 2010).
(4.) This is not surprising, as the population of wildcats in Britain only became separated from the European wildcat at the end of the last ice age, about 7000-9000 years ago--a relatively short time in terms of mammalian speciation (Yalden, 1999).
We have three different cats in Europe - the Iberian lynx, European wildcat and Eurasian lynx.
Also, whereas it was previously thought that there were at least four genetically separate species of small cat - the house cat, the Asiatic wildcat, the European wildcat and the African wildcat - it is now recognised that all of the species are anatomically identical.
The question whether the European wildcat, adapted to cooler climate than other small to medium sized felids, shows changes in body mass or size in response to climate change as indicated for other animals is addressed.
To look for genetic variants associated with domestication, the researchers examined DNA from 22 cats from six domestic breeds (Felis silvestris catus), two European wildcats (F.

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