Europhilia


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Europhilia

(ˌjʊərəʊˈfɪlɪə)
n (sometimes not capital)
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) admiration for Europe, Europeans, or the European Union
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
For example, while Johnson first came into the public eye as the Daily Telegraph correspondent in Brussels, firing off coruscating tomes about the great European federalist plot, on other occasions he has shown considerable Europhilia. Back in 2001, Johnson backed the arch-Europhile Kenneth Clarke for leader of the Conservative Party against Euroskeptic rivals.
No one on the Remain side satisfactorily explained where British national identity fits into Europhilia. 'Britishness' is taken by some as a byword for leftover imperial urges.
It is high time for the Greek elites to realize the dangers involved in their unquestionable Europhilia that often leads to a policy inertia or policy dependency on Brussels.
It is intriguing to imagine how different a country we live in if ardent europhilia had entered the political mainstream decades earlier.
"Between Europhobia and Europhilia: Party and Popular Attitudes Towards Membership of the European Union in Serbia and Croatia." Perspectives on European Politics and Society Vol.
From this lens, elite and politicians are "seeking to be identified by europhilia in education and consumption" (p 70).
Firstly, in terms of public perceptions of the concrete benefits that EU membership brings to Poland, this meant that Polish Europhilia was highly contingent and could possibly come under strain as these benefits start to wear thin.
5 A new map shows where levels of 'euroscepticisim' and 'europhilia' are at their greatest in the UK.
I have always believed the main reason Britain voted to stay in what was then called the Common Market in 1975 was not down to our innate Europhilia, but simply a fear that leaving would result in large-scale unemployment.
All public opinion polls, conducted by local and international "pollsters," show Euro-enthusiasm and Europhilia with a structure of over 61 percent to even 80 percent of citizens.
These positions mirror the often facile Europhilia on the American left that vaguely embraces Europe as a blue state, while demonstrating little knowledge of, or interest in, stronger political integration, and they are just as dangerously provincial and shortsighted.