Eustachian tube

(redirected from Eustachian tubes)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

eu·sta·chian tube

or Eu·sta·chian tube  (yo͞o-stā′shən, -shē-ən, -kē-ən)
n. Anatomy
A slender tube that connects the tympanic cavity with the nasal part of the pharynx and serves to equalize air pressure on either side of the eardrum.

[After Bartolomeo Eustachio.]

Eustachian tube

(juːˈsteɪʃən)
n
(Anatomy) a tube that connects the middle ear with the nasopharynx and equalizes the pressure between the two sides of the eardrum
[C18: named after Bartolomeo Eustachio, 16th-century Italian anatomist]

Eu•sta′chian tube`

(yuˈsteɪ ʃən, -ˈsteɪ ki ən)
n.
(often l.c.) a canal extending from the middle ear to the pharynx.
[1735–45; after B. Eustachio; see -an1]

eu·sta·chian tube

(yo͞o-stā′shən)
A slender tube that connects the middle ear with the upper part of the pharynx, serving to equalize air pressure on either side of the eardrum.

eustachian tube

(or auditory tube) A tube between the middle ear and the throat. It helps to equalize air pressure.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Eustachian tube - either of the paired tubes connecting the middle ears to the nasopharynxEustachian tube - either of the paired tubes connecting the middle ears to the nasopharynx; equalizes air pressure on the two sides of the eardrum
salpinx - a tube in the uterus or the ear
middle ear, tympanic cavity, tympanum - the main cavity of the ear; between the eardrum and the inner ear
Translations

Eustachian tube

[juːˌsteɪʃənˈtjuːb] Ntrompa f de Eustaquio

Eustachian tube

Eustachian tube

[juːˈsteɪʃnˈtjuːb] ntromba di Eustachio

Eustachian tube

n. trompa de Eustaquio, parte del conducto auditivo.

Eustachian tube

n trompa de Eustaquio
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Otieno explained that babies have little openings from the back of their throats to their ears called Eustachian tubes, which are shorter, wider and flatter."When you feed your baby in a lying position, the liquid pools in the back of the mouth.
Eustachi is the first product marketed to help exercise the eustachian tubes.
The imbalance between the air pressure in the middle ear and the air pressure in the cabin around you, which changes rapidly during ascent and descent, is usually equalised by the air that flows through the Eustachian tubes, which connects the middle ear to the upper throat and back of the nasal cavity.
But upper respiratory tract infections can cause the Eustachian tubes to become congested, which means fluids will remain trapped in the middle ear.
The results from a recent clinical study demonstrated a 99.7% technical success rate in Eustachian tubes dilated with the Acclarent AERA device, concluded the company.
Function of Eustachian tubes of the subjects' healthy ears were observed microscopically with Valsalva maneuver.
The four muscles of the soft palate (palatoglossus, palatopharyngeus, tensor veli palatini, and levator veli palatini) aid in swallowing and are critical in opening of the Eustachian tubes; thus, injury to the palatal region can impair these functions.
If you swallow or hold your nose and exhale with your mouth closed, the eustachian tubes, which connect the ears to the nose and throat, will usually open, allowing air into the middle ear and equalising the pressure.
The infection occurs with acute onset in the eardrum, behind the tympanic membrane, with presence of middle ear effusion, obstruction of the eustachian tubes and signs of middle ear inflammation [Hoberman and Paradise, 2000].
I believe the process of yawning opens the eustachian tubes which equalizes the pressure in the middle ear which, in turn, allows for improved sound conduction through the ossicles into the inner ear.
Since Eustacian tubes connect ears to the back of the throat (and the respiratory system), it's easy to see how air pollution might affect how Eustachian tubes function.